Organ Sales Will Save Lives Analysis

1367 Words 6 Pages
In the article, "Organ Sales Will Save Lives, by Joanne MacKay, she appeals to the readers’ emotions by raising awareness that there are thousands of people in the world that die every year due to not enough life-saving organs, specifically kidneys. End Stage Renal Disease is when the kidneys stop working and the patient must endure grueling dialysis treatments and put on the transplant list, where they wait for a very long time for a cadaver kidney donation (MacKay ##). With only these options, some patients look to the black market to purchase a kidney, because it is banned in the United States. MacKay's argument is that "Governments should not ban the sale of human organs; they should regulate it. Lives should not be wasted; they should …show more content…
This is also supported by Matas, who claims, "discussing organ sales simply does not feel right, but letting candidates die on the waiting list (when this could be prevented) also does not feel right" (2008). MacKay is basing her argument on the fact that there are not enough donated kidneys in the world for all of the people that are on the transplant list, so something has to be done to save the thousands of lives dying each year. In 1984, the National Organ Transplant Act made it a federal crime to, "knowingly acquire, receive, or otherwise transfer any human organ for valuable consideration for use in human transplantation if the transfer affects interstate commerce" (2007). By legalizing and regulating the sale of kidneys the wait time for a kidney will decrease, the availability of a kidney will increase and most importantly lives will be …show more content…
The reader will understand exactly how hard and long it can take to be able to receive a kidney transplant in the United States. They will also understand that to increase kidney sales would help to limit the number of patients that would have to sit on the transplant list for years, and it would increase the number of kidneys available for donation (Matas 2009). MacKay also believes by allowing people to sell their kidneys; it would give them the push they need to help out a stranger (MacKay 122). Matas says they have tried for forty years to increase organ donation but have been unsuccessful, so it is time to try something different (Matas 2008). Additionally, MacKay appeals to the compassionate side of the reader by speaking of the difficulties that the patient goes through from; dialysis, waiting on the transplant list, hope, disappointment and sometimes even trying to receive a kidney on the black market. MacKay was very credible by listing facts in her article and by doing so, she convinces the reader that there is a true need for the legalization and regulation of kidney

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