The Importance Of Organ Donation Rates In The United States

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The U.S. organ donation rates in the United States are not as bad as in other countries according to the ABC news. According to the ABC news, the United States has 26 organ donors per million people; however, this rate does not seem like much when is compared to number of patients waiting for an organ transplant. The shortage of organs causes more people to die while they are waiting for a transplant and the increase of organs sales in the black market. Organ donation rates are low and are not enough to meet the need; therefore, more programs should be considered in order to decrease the shortage of organs in the United States.
The shortage of organs has many people dying each day as they wait for a transplant. According to Ahmad and Iftikhar (2016), “On average, 22 patients die each year while waiting for a transplant” (p.25). The shortage of organs also increases the possibilities for crime. People seeking to sell their organs as a way for them to get money has them getting victimized and taken advantage of by criminals. People dying and having an increase in crime should be more than enough reasons for the shortage of organs to be looked at and take to steps necessary to remediate the problem. According to Fasting, Christensen, and Glending having a higher
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A system like the opt-out system is something that has been proved to work in other countries such as Spain along with programs that educate the public and a comprehensive national organ procurement system (Ahmad and Iftikhar 2016). Another good thing that could come out from having different programs and systems is a decrease in crime. Having the adequate number of organs available should have fewer people looking for an organ in the black market and by this reducing the crime that arises from the black

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