Oregon V. Smith Case Study

1940 Words 8 Pages
Question 1) Oregon vs. Smith, is a United States Supreme Court case that determined wither or not the state could reject unemployment benefits to a person fired for violating a state’s narcotic prohibition, even if the use of the drug was part of a religious ritual. Legally states have the right to accommodate some illegal acts done in pursuit of religious beliefs, but they are not required to make accommodations. This made The Supreme Court decision a major event in Native American religious beliefs, the case attracted widespread support form not only Native religious beliefs but also voodoo religious beliefs. Oregon v. Smith had a diverse range of religious groups eager to protect their own religious freedom and their use of spiritual medicine. …show more content…
Georgia is notable for its unanimous court decision. In Stanley v. Georgia, the Court concludes that Georgia was unconstitutional, due to the First Amendment; Georgia made it illegal for the private possession of pornography even if the sale and distribution of that same material would not be legally protected. The Court found that an individual has "a right to satisfy emotional needs in the privacy of his or her own house ()." The Courts did protect adults obtaining pornography but however did not extend to pornography involving children. Smith v California concerns what must be shown to convict a bookseller in an obscenity case. The Court concludes that the First Amendment requires the State of California to prove more than the fact that the bookstore contains pornography legally, deviant in nature and intentional …show more content…
Ferguson, is one of the most important Supreme Court decision made dealing with civil rights issues. The Court ruled on the concept of 'separate but equal ' and set back the civil rights movement and race relations in the United States. In Plessy v. Ferguson, the Supreme Court considered the constitutionality of a Louisiana law passed in 1890 "providing for separate railway carriages for the white and colored races ()." The law, required that all passenger railways provide separate cars for black and white passengers, with one stipulation that the cars be equal in service, the law even went further in banning whites from sitting in black railroad cars and blacks in white railroad cars. The law penalized any passenger or railway employees for violating its terms of the segregated rail road cars. The Louisiana law had a few exceptions for doctors and nurses attending to patience of the other race in rail road

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