Essay On Ordinary Bag Of Rubbish

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What is it that distinguished and ordinary bag of rubbish from a major work of art that just looks like a bag of rubbish? Can anything be art- and if so,what makes it art? In response to the question and my knowledge question the thing that distinguishes ordinary bag of rubbish from major work of Art is “label”, expression, perception, interpretation, language and aesthetics through which we start to realize the beauty of art. No, anything can 't be art because something to be called art or major work of art it has to meet the criteria/ standard of ART, but at the same time it also involves how individual perceives art. If art meets criteria of an individual person then it makes it art, yet it varies from person to person. The criteria might include beauty, shapes, size, label, interpretation and …show more content…
Now in reference to my knowledge question, anyone who discuss about what great art is, has to include label, expression, perception, interpretation, language and aesthetics. Label is something to take in consideration while discussing art because ordinary bag of rubbish can be called major art just by the label given by individual. For example, when in Mr. Black class we used all the scrap, recycle and garbage paper and then made art out of it. This is one instance where label changed the perception of ordinary piece of art to major work of art because of “label” it was given. In similar token, the label of originality in art vs fake art is also the factor that affects the way we perceive art. Because wherever we see art or for instance let 's take when we went to art institute of Chicago on field trip and saw the art, the question being ask left and right was Is this art original? And when mentor said yes it is original then after that they consider it a piece of art. So this tells me that labeling the art changes the perception of how good the

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