Or Adolescence Impact The Development Of A Mental Illness?

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Assignment Nine Experiencing multiple traumatic events throughout important developmental stages, long-lasting stress, and extreme anxiety impacts the growth of intellectual structures (Borja and Ostrosky 927). Here is the question. Can a traumatic event that occurred in childhood or adolescence impact the development of a mental illness in the future? The answer to this is yes it can, especially if the traumatic event happened during the young years of a person’s life. The stress of witnessing and or falling victim to physically and emotionally traumatic events increases the likelihood of developing mental illnesses later in life. Physical abuse includes having been a victim of physical punishment, for example, striking with the hands …show more content…
People that are diagnosed with OCD will do these rituals even though it will interfere with their everyday life (National Institute of Mental Health 6). The symptoms for this disease will come and go, it can get better in time, or they can even get worse (National Institute of Mental Health 6). 2.2 million Americans are affected by OCD, along with another disorders, and it is seen in men just as much as women (National Institute of Mental Health 6). Symptoms for Obsessive-compulsive disorder is normally noticed in adolescence, childhood, or coming into adulthood and research reveals that OCD might run in a family (National Institute of Mental Health …show more content…
In some cases, just thinking about going through the day makes them have anxiety (National Institute of Mental Health 12). This disorder is only diagnosed when the person has worries for daily problems for a minimum of six months (National Institute of Mental Health 12). These people are startled very easily, have a hard time concentrating, and cannot relax (National Institute of Mental Health 12). There are many physical symptoms that come with this disorder such as: vomiting, twitching, irritability, trembling, tiredness, muscle tension, headaches, having a hard time swallowing, achy muscles, sweating, frequent bathroom trips, hot flashes, lightheadedness, and feeling like they cannot catch their breath (National Institute of Mental Health 12). Two times more women than men have GAD and it is diagnosed in 6.8 million Americans (National Institute of Mental Health 13). GAD is gradually developed, but it can start at any time in life, but the time for largest risk of being diagnosed are in-between childhood and the middle age years (National Institute of Mental Health

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