One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest: Movie Analysis

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1 in 5 adults in America suffer from some kind of mental illness, yet only 4% of the US healthcare budget goes towards helping mental health. In our society, a stigma towards mental health has been implanted into our culture. Characteristics of this stigma include violent, isolationism, and A large impact on this stigma is the movie industry because of the large audience it's able to connect with.
The movie industry has created an image of mental health that connotates negativity. Movies will depict people with mental health as violent; characters like McMurphy from One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest help further this stigma. McMurphy is a violent man who allegedly has schizophrenia, though the representation of this disease in the movie is inaccurate. Because of the character’s susceptibility to violence, many people tend to believe that all people with this disease are innately violent. However, violent tendencies are not leading characteristics of people with schizophrenia.
Several movies have taken a different position on mental
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Perks of being a Wallflower is an excellent example of film that, for the most part, displays an accurate take on a mental illness. The main character Charlie has depression and PTSD, both of which are shown throughout the movie, and by the end of the film, Charlie has received help for both. However neither illness is completely cured and the reason for the recovery is not love or a superhuman ability to turn it off, but instead help from a doctor. Society has created an image of abnormality towards not just getting help for a mental illness but even just having a mental illness. Unfortunately, this stigma affects the way people talk about and treat mental health, or don’t treat in most cases. Perks of being a Wallflower not only acknowledges mental health issues, but also presents receiving help as a good thing instead of a weird or bad

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