Olympe De Gouges Analysis

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Let’s start with the Declaration of the Rights of Women by Olympe de Gouges, which was written in 1791. De Gouge fearlessly criticized not just the men of politics, but the entire population of men, and didn’t hold back on the words she used to describe them. She asserted that having superior genders is nothing but “empty pretentions” and women should wake up and disrupt this cycle. She also stated that equality could be achieved if women would stand up, unite, and have the will to use their inner power to break free from inferiority. Her vision of women equality started with her proposal of a marriage contract that would provide fair distribution of wealth as deemed by both parties (husband and wife), with their children being priorities. …show more content…
These two activists desired a countrywide change by amending the constitution instead of going for the state-by-state approach that the older women wanted to do. They started to get recognized through lobbying and protests against those who were not in favor of their cause. A politician’s wife has supported the two, and has been the key to their victory. After the suffragettes were put to jail and continued on protesting through hunger strikes, they were treated inhumanely. As the politician visited his wife, his eyes were opened to how women were treated so badly that it sparked the change that they needed with the help of the public, which made President Wilson to approved the amendment. These two ladies proved de Gouge’s point that a woman’s will can change the way society looks at women- they inspired and lead a group of women that would create a greater voice to benefit all women in the United …show more content…
Valenti discussed that the problems about gender oppression are still there, and most of the big organizations are not representing the reality of being feminists such as reproductive rights, poverty, and social injustice. She stated that aside from these problems, all women nowadays are not perceived as equal. Valenti used an example of her friend, who was supposed to speak for a panel, but NOW (a feminist organization) stated that she was basically not good enough to deliver because of her age and job description. She showcased that aside from sexism, women segregation (the old and the young) is also becoming a big problem. However, she stated that women don’t need the image of being in a “sisterhood”, because women don’t need to be labeled to implement

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