Ojibwa Warrior And Americans: An Analysis

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The similarities between the American Indians that Dennis Banks discussed in Ojibwa Warrior and Americans that Russell Means describes in Russell Means: Americans are the New Indians lie in the fact that both have lost constitutional rights and freedoms that they once had. This is a social problem caused by the centralized power of the United States Government. (Macaluso, 2016). Because the power lies mostly within the Executive Branch of the government, the military, and the large corporations, it is easy for laws to be passed and enforced that disadvantage people with less power and particularly people of a different race or ethnicity, which is known as institutionalized racism (Macaluso, 2016; Conley, 2015). These three groups that contain …show more content…
It was created in 1824 to deal with Native American conflict (Conley, 2016). With so much power resting on one group of people, it was easier for the Bureau of Indian Affairs to create these boarding schools in an attempt to eliminate the American Indian culture because they had the means to do so. For example, the Bureau of Indian Affairs would be able to force Native American children into boarding schools, claiming it was right using legal documentation and thus promoting institutionalized racism (Banks & Erdoes 2004; Conley 2015). From this point on, social change is motivated thought the struggle for Native Americans to gain rights and have more power over the government and law enforcement. This idea aligns with Karl Marx’s conflict theory as an explanation for social change because the conflict between the government and Native Americans motivated the formation of the American Indian Movement in 1968 (Conley, 2015; Banks & Erdoes, …show more content…
He says that there is “information deprivation” (Means, 2012) going on in America within the federal school systems in order to keep the power of the government centralized. The people of America are not being fully informed the about their lack of control over monetary system and Russell believe it would take a revolution to regain control (Means, 2012). Russell argues that people were once able to control the government through unions to create the GI Bill. However, the education system stopped teaching the values that Russell believed are necessary for a revolution. For instance, he believes that honesty should be taught more in schools because honesty is such an important part of localized government. If localized governments are formed, Americans would have more power control over things such as the monetary system and regain their right to have control over the power elite (Means,

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