Offshore Wind Energy Case Study

1184 Words 5 Pages
Offshore wind energy is an innovative approach to addressing climate change and the global energy crisis. Although many projects have begun, there are currently no offshore operational projects in the United States. Through the case study of the failed Cape Wind project, we can better understand the importance of integrating aspects of land use planning, environmental impact assessments, and historical and human considerations when designing a project like an offshore wind plant. Furthermore, through investigating the design process for a new and large offshore wind farm—such as the Bay State Wind project—the essential considerations and complexities behind developing and siting a wind farm off the coast of Massachusetts (MA) can be revealed. …show more content…
Thus, more electricity can be generated from offshore than from onshore wind turbines (NASA). While around 53 percent of the nation’s population lives in cities or coastal areas, the U.S. lacks an abundance of land-based renewable energy resources and energy costs are often quite high (BOEM). Offshore wind energy resources in the U.S. could supply “immense quantities of renewable energy to major U.S. coastal cities” (BOEM). The Department of Energy (DOE) has predicted that, by 2030, the United States could have 22 GW of installed offshore wind capacity—enough to meet 2 percent of our electricity demand but less than 5 percent of the overall resource potential (Small). Despite preliminary projects near the northeastern shores, there are currently no offshore operational projects in the U.S., due to slow political support, high costs, and resource intermittency. Through an evaluation of the factors behind Cape Wind’s ultimate demise and the process behind designing an offshore wind project like Bay State Wind, the essential considerations and complexities behind developing an offshore wind farm in Massachusetts’s (MA’s) waters can be …show more content…
This 25-square-mile power plant could provide 75 percent of the required electricity for the surrounding islands (Machell). CWA secured a lease for 46 square miles in the Sound, quoting reduced greenhouse emissions, job creation, and greater energy independence. Furthermore, they said, the forecasted 468 MW of energy from Cape Wind would reduce pricing volatility, increase electricity reliability during peak demand, and enable MA to maintain its clean energy leadership (“Project Benefits”). It is essential that planners conduct extensive background research on the history of the site, coordinate with local communities, and secure reliable partners to execute the project, as seen in this

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