Of Olaudah Equiano's The Interesting Narrative Of The Slave Trade?

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A former slave by the name of Olaudah Equiano wrote his own book called The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano. His life started in the country of Eboe, which is now the country of Guinea in Africa. His life was simple and so were his people. In his native land, his father was a village elder so their family were in higher status quo. Slaves were a common thing around his village and often time’s people from his tribe owned slaves. One thing he noticed was the difference between the way slaves who belonged to Europeans were treated and the way his tribe treated their slaves. The paper will examine the destructiveness of the slave trade and its effects on the people involved, and the push to abolish the slave trade. In the …show more content…
The masters stripped of their name, language, culture, and their overall identity to have complete control. He personally experienced this after he was sold to numerous masters and especially his European masters. They changed his name to a European name that suited their needs and were not mindful to the fact if he wanted it or not. Slave masters wanted their slaves conformed to their culture while steadily wiping theirs away by changing their names and religion. He saw this happen to many slaves and endured it himself, while recognizing that this played an important part in the slave trade. The loss of identity was not the only thing Equiano described as an impact on a slave, but the anguish of being torn from your family hit many slaves the hardest. The separation from his sister confirmed that the slave trade was destructive to the families of those kidnapped. Slaves faced separation at any time so their masters could maintain …show more content…
He bought his own freedom, pursued an education, and advocated for the abolishment of the slave trade. History is like many other Africans who were kidnapped and enslaved, but he was able to free himself unlike many other slaves. The interesting part about Equiano is that he adopted European culture, but still recognized his rich African roots even after he was stripped out of his culture during his enslavement. Equiano did not endure slavery as long as other slaves did, but his experiences drove him to be an abolitionist. In all, his narrative unlocked the destructive nature of the slave trade and described not only his experience, but also the experiences of everyone else involved and their

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