Of Mice And Men Hopes And Dreams

1042 Words 5 Pages
Having hopes and dreams in an area that’s dying both in an economic and social way will have one common outcome. John Steinbeck’s Of Mice and Men is set in Salinas, California, during the 1930s and centers around two men, George, the leader, and Lennie, the follower with a mental disability. During the 1930s, The Great Depression was occurring which caused many Americans to move from place to place, seeking for an occupation. George and Lennie are on a mission to accomplish their dream which is to own a ranch by seeking for an occupation in order to save money and purchase a ranch. When pursuing their dream, they encounter conflicts along the way. The theme of one of the presented topics is hopes and dreams being in a dead end cycle unless …show more content…
For example, when walking to the ranch, George discovers Lennie carrying a deceased mouse. As a result of the discovery, George asks, “You gonna give me that mouse or do I have to sock you?” (Steinbeck 4). In other words, George is asking Lennie if Lennie is going to hand over the mouse to George, or George will have to beat him up in order to acquire the mouse. Furthermore, the significance of this discourse is how Lennie killing the mouse connects to how assassinating an animal can have hopes and dreams end up being in a deadlock era since Lennie killing animals consistently foreshadows how George and Lennie will end up in trouble, thus causing them to run away and restart their dream. In addition, at the barn with a deceased puppy, Lennie says, “Why do you got to get killed? You ain’t so little as mice. I didn’t bounce you hard” (Steinbeck 87). In other words, Lennie is asking why the puppy died since the puppy isn’t as small as the mouse and according to Lennie, he didn’t made an attempt to bounce the puppy with extreme force. Additionally, the importance of this dialogue is how killing the puppy relates to slaying the mouse since both events foretells the predicament that George and Lennie will have to face, thus making George and Lennie to break away and reestablish their dream. Therefore, due to the similar results, aspirations …show more content…
For example, when George and Lennie were at the river, Steinbeck narrates, “And George raised the gun…to the back of Lennie’s head…He pulled the trigger” (106). In other words, George aims a gun at the back of Lennie’s head and shoots Lennie. Additionally, the significance of this narration is how George sacrificing Lennie corresponds to how hopes and dreams being a deadlock cycle is the theme since George is sacrificing his companion. In addition, inside the bunkhouse, Candy conveys to George, “I ought to of shot that dog myself, George. I shouldn’t of ought to let no stranger shoot my dog” (Steinbeck 61). In other words, Candy wanted to shoot his dog rather than having someone such as Carlson to shoot the dog for him. Furthermore, the implication of this discourse is that sacrificing Candy’s dog connects to George immolating Lennie since both events displays how aspirations and imagination being a deadlock cycle is the theme. Therefore, aspirations and imagination being in a deadlock cycle is the theme because, a ranch worker will have to immolate a ranch worker’s

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