Of Consumerism In Betty Friedan's The Feminine Mystique?

Looking back in history, the 1950’s and the 1960’s are a time of tense foreign relations with the Soviet Union and domestic social conformity. The Federal Government, along with corporate entities, peddled a narrative of anti-communist propaganda by pushing for the ideals of a nuclear family and consumerism. Anti-Communist propaganda shaped the social and political lifestyle for Americans across the country. Because the Federal Government shaped the social norms of this era, Americans were forced to adhere to the ideals of a strict, consumer based, nuclear family. However, many felt discontent with these new social norms that were forced upon them. As a result, political movements such as Feminism, Black Power, and Union movements, sprung …show more content…
Many began to reject the onslaught of propaganda that pushed for the ideal of a suburban housewife. In Betty Friedan’s book, The Feminine Mystique, Friedan highlights how women began to feel dissatisfied with their lives. Friedan states, “of the growing thousands of women currently getting private psychiatric help …, the married ones were reported dissatisfied with their marriages.” American propagandists ignored the reality that women had their own ambitions and dreams apart from a suburban housewife. By peddling the narrative that the Suburban housewife was the ideal for women, they instituted a generation of young women who were discontent with their lives and marriages. Just like men, women have dreams of their own and wanted to fulfill their dreams. However, the antiquated social norm of a suburban housewife prevented many women from going into the workforce. It was seen as taboo for women to work, resulting in many women to feel dissatisfied with their lives. This dissatisfaction among young women across America lead to the uprising of second wave Feminism. The Feminist Movement of the 1960’s and 1970’s was a push for the rejection of the domestic housewife. They believed it was the women’s choice on whether she wants to be a part of the workforce, instead of government pushed societal norms. Second wave Feminism served to critique the Federal Government’s policies of …show more content…
The Black Panthers felt that the welfare system in America did not help the Black communities and felt that racial discrimination by police, government institutions, and white supremacist groups, lead to an America that was Anti-Black. In David Hillard’s Autobiography, This Side of Glory, Hillard states that America “is a white man’s heaven [and] is a black man’s hell.” According to Hillard, the Black Panther’s believed that the only way to stop the vicious treatment of Blacks in America was to be aggressive and fight for their liberty. They believed in a complete social reformation of America that established welfare programs that would help inner city blacks to get out of poverty. Additionally, they called for the end of police brutality and racial disparities against blacks in prisons. The Black Panther party gained traction because, unlike previous Black civil rights movements, the Black Panthers advocated for violence against corrupt and evil government

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