Oedipus Moral Analysis

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In the city of Thebes plagues have fallen onto the people and distressed King Oedipus is desperate to find a solution. Since Oedipus freed the citizens from a murderous Sphinx the people hope that Oedipus will salvage the city once more. Oedipus desperately sends, his brother-in-law, Creon to seek advice from the oracle of Apollo. Once Creon arrives from his journey he informs Oedipus that Thebes will be saved if the murderer of the former king of Thebes is found and prosecuted. Although the murder of King Laius occurred years ago, at a crossroad, Oedipus is determined to know who murdered him. His investigation begins once he announces to the citizens that they must turn in any information about the murderer of Laius. When nobody has any …show more content…
Nobody can escape their destiny because it will eventually occur but once Oedipus hears his fate he flees. Oedipus believes that he is making a rational decision to not fulfill his fate to murder his father and bed with his mother. If he were to accept that universal taboo than Oedipus would be obscene, but he is a man of high ethical standards. Oedipus is aware of the power of the gods but by fleeing his destiny it proves that Oedipus attempts to avoid evil. Even though Oedipus yearns to make the right decision he ultimately wishes to avoid the consequences of his actions. His fate will leave him as an outcast and looked down upon by not only the gods but by society as well. Oedipus believes he can thwart his fate by leaving the city but the gods engineered his fate to come true. “I was running to a place where I would never see that shameful prophecy come true” (Sophocles, 52). Throughout the play Oedipus tries to justify his actions for leaving his parents at Corinth but he cannot face the fact that the prophecy may come true. No matter how pleasant or appalling a fate may be nobody can go against the will of the …show more content…
If a mortal can hinder the god’s plan then he can overcome any obstacle, which made him even more egotistical. Oedipus’s pride also intensifies when he thinks he saved the people of Thebes from the Sphinx, but he unknowingly caused their torment. As the new king of Thebes Oedipus is convinced that he is a righteous leader but his ego clouds his judgement. For instance throughout the play Oedipus constantly proclaims how he will solve the plagues cast upon Thebes but he declares that he is in more pain than the citizens. “But sick though you may be, there is not one of you as sick as I” (Sophocles, 4). Even during times of suffering of his citizens Oedipus manages to put himself above all. Also Oedipus’s nobility causes him to be easily paranoid and rash in difficult situations. Oedipus is quick to suspect Creon in treason and threatens anybody that does not grant him the answers he desires. Oedipus may want justice for Laius and Thebes but his search for the truth ends up as an investigation for the mystery of his birth. Oedipus begins to focus on himself, even though Jocasta and Tiresias urge him not to. Furthermore Oedipus values logic more than anything but he refuses to believe in the truth. Once Oedipus fully comprehends the truth he quickly gives Thebes and his father justice by mutilating his eyes. All Oedipus desired was to avoid the evil of his fate but his search

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