Oedipus Crux Analysis

995 Words 4 Pages
Oedipus Crux, the article I read was deceptively simple. On the exterior, the article posed a simple question, did Oedipus actually murder his father. It used this question to weave a counter the dominant narrative that the majority of people believe. Kurt Fosso talks about the process of teaching his kids in class, and through his teaching of contrasting perspective about the play Oedipus Rex, the kids, “ initially viewed this task perverse or just plain impossible”[Fosso 2]. He diagnoses the solution to the problem citing dominant narratives of knowledge as the problem. People use their preconceived notions to interpret their beliefs. Therefore, it was difficult to introduce counter-narratives to their very static notions of how the world …show more content…
As the chorus correctly said when being questioned with Oedipus’s guilt, to truly "find fault with the king" they need to "see the word/proved right beyond doubt"( Sophocles 506-8) Fosso thoroughly goes through the process of proving Oedipus innocent. His biggest object of contestation is the carriage. He questions the credibility of the carriage riders. Since the carriage did not have anything that would suggest it had royal ties, instead the carriage was not protected by an “embassy” nor according to Fosso the king did not have “royal markings”[Fosso 4]. This begins to lend doubt the credibility of varying accounts. Fosso continues to talk about the major differences between eyewitness accounts. Eyewitness such as Creon said that the king was attacked by a flurry of people, like a gang of robbers. Jocasta herself says that "In all there were but five, and among them a herald; and one carriage for the king that there were at least six people traveling with the king.”(Sophocles 753-754) So, why did Oedipus only kill three people, and why does Oedipus not remember anybody escaping from the band of …show more content…
Many scholars think that Sophocles wrote his play to serve as a warning against the dangers of fate, in a heavily fate centered world. Fosso turns this interpretation on its head. He believes that the play is doubly ironic. Fosso believes that Sophocles’s play demonstrates why believing so heavily in fate can lead to a circumstance like Oedipus got himself into. The power of words or semiotics, shape the interpretations of the world. I would agree that the latter part of Fosso’s thesis statement. I think it is true that disrupting the dominant narratives through turning a hub of culture on its head would be beneficial. I think that looking at common and dominant perspectives through a contrary lens can be very beneficial because it is able to teach people something that didn’t know before.Disrupting these dominant types narrative provides potential for change and growth. These self-convicting narratives have the power to shape reality and confuse the nature of

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