Obtaining The Confession: Theoretical Analysis

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Identification…
A crime in any magnitude is a social conflict. As an individual grows and develops, he or she is introduced to certain ideals such as right and wrong. The central ethical issue in “Obtaining the Confession” is justice, and the techniques in police interrogations in order to produce a confession which include lying to suspects, empathizing with him or her to lead them to tell the truth, offering leniency and inferring that there is a small window in which to confess in order for the suspect to secure a less severe punishment. According to John Locke, a British medical doctor and philosopher, every individual has equal liberties that include rights such as security, to protect against murder, injury, or torture, and due process
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government uses many approaches to interrogation. A former spy stated that there were a total of 16 best used and commonly practiced techniques. There is the “direct approach” in which a suspect is simply asked the questions. Other approaches include knowledge, where the interrogator, or officer tells the suspect “we know it all.” Basically, saying that someone snitched and gave up vital information concerning the crime and the suspect needs to answer questions to preserve his or her own self-interest. The “Good cop, bad cop” approach consists of two officers taking separate sides of the suspect’s ego. The good cop, sympathizes with the suspect and the bad cop does the opposite. The “silent treatment” usually only works with unstable suspects. The rapid fire questioning approach is designed to overwhelm the suspect by interrupting their responses, and verbally exhausting them so that when the suspect finally is offered time to speak, they answer truthfully. (Augustine, 2016). Certain argument techniques such as using deductive arguing and inductive arguing to establish facts can also build a stronger offense for the suspect to attempt to defend themselves. The suspect, once taken in for questioning, would do better to cooperate and see that there must be some reason for them to be there. Using critical thinking to communicate would most likely put both officer and suspect at odds. They would both have time to evaluate the situation and have a systematic process to …show more content…
The crime, either large or small in magnitude has multiple stakeholders including the criminal, the city and its citizens. . The city and its citizens are stake holders because they pay for the police department’s security. The law enforcement agency and the person place or things involved in the crime also are stake holders because they play roles in the setting and aftermath of the crime. In the central ethical issue’s circumstance, the act of utilitarianism would be for the chief of the police to allow his officers to question the convicted sexual predator. The reason for the act would be to make the officer’s happy and the chief of police happy, unfortunately the sexual predator would not be happy either innocent or guilty because he is under the microscope. If the missing child’s parents were aware of the chief’s actions they would also be happy seeing that their tax dollars are being used to find more information to help find their son. Using non-consequential theory’s rule of natural rights, any law enforcement agency would uphold the belief of human life, health, procreation, caring for children and their welfare, knowledge and avoidance of ignorance, human relationships and the consideration of other people’s interests (Manias & Monroe,

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