Objectivism And Altruism Analysis

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Teaching Objectivism to the courtroom, Rearden is attacking Collectivism and Altruism by accepting reality; that one must produce for their own self-interest in order to pursue their own happiness and prosperity; anything outside those motives are illogical and immoral. This moral code he is condemning breaks the law of existence: “A is A (1038)”. If A is not A, a person’s sole motive to live is not for himself, rather, to live for others. This premise denies reality, reason, and logic in place of faith, sacrifice, and force. When Rearden declares “The public good be damned, I will have no part of it!” he condemns the irrational value system that promotes using oneself as a sacrificial animal and its methods of gaining control: by debilitating …show more content…
This plays into the game of the looter’s so that they can maintain their control. If people do not have the capacity to think, they will not be able to realize, or take action to stop, the government’s actions. The pillars of education and influence to culture such as Balph Eubank, Dr Simon Pritchett, and Dr Floyd Ferris damn man-kind for his right to live, and label him as “impure” for it. As Floyd Ferris writes his publication Why do you think you think?, he writes it for “the drunken lout (347)” and preaches to “people that science is a futile fraud which ought to be abolished(346)”. Same as when Dr Simon Prichett explains at Rearden’s party “Man? what is man? He just a collection of chemicals with delusions of grandeur (130)”. At the same party Balph Eubank, when asked what the “real essence of life (133)” is, he answers “Defeated and suffering (133)”. These teachings disable the general public of realizing the purpose for their actions or the value behind it. With this, the looter’s get an extra bonus in teaching the non-existence of reason, values, or law in life; it allows them to do as they please. Whether its speciality railroad service for Kip Chalmers, or expensive parties with Cuffy Meigs, the purpose is to further deny reality; main the illusion that they are more capable, important, and intelligent than they truly …show more content…
They can not think or process anything because they have been taught they are not worthy of it. Whether it is the “mystics of muscle(1035)” or “mystics of spirit (1035)” they convince themselves of being, they disarm themselves of their “volitional consciousness (1012)”. Since they do not think, they can not form values; they can not identify virtues or form a purpose for their lives. With no purpose, happiness is not obtainable and their entire life is filled with frustration and pain. Therefore, the phrase “I couldn’t help it! I had no choice! (page number)” which is consistently heard of James Taggart and other looters when they fail at an endeavour, proves their inability to control reality to whatever way they see

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