Paramedical Workers: The Bedrock Of Medical Ethics

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The term “paramedical” refers to occupations whose work is both organized around tasks of healing and ultimately controlled by the authority of physicians. Ultimate control by medical authority is manifested in a number of ways. First, much of the technical knowledge learned by paramedical workers during the course of their training and used during the course of their work tends to be discovered, enlarged upon, and approved by physicians. Second, the tasks performed by paramedical workers tend to assist, rather than directly replace, the focal tasks of diagnosis and treatment. Third, paramedical workers tend to be subordinate in that their work tends to be performed at the request or “order” of, and is often supervised by, physicians. Finally, …show more content…
Each addresses a value that arises in interactions between providers and patients. The principles address the issue of fairness, honesty, and respect for fellow human beings.
• Autonomy: People have the right to control what happens to their bodies.
• Beneficence: All healthcare providers must strive to improve their patient’s health, to do the most good for the patient in every situation.
• Non maleficence: “First, do no harm” is the bedrock of medical ethics. In every situation, healthcare providers should avoid causing harm to their patients. You should also be aware of the doctrine ofdouble effect, where a treatment intended for good unintentionally causes harm. This doctrine helps you make difficult decisions about whether actions with double effects can be undertaken.
• Justice: The fourth principle demands that you should try to be as fair as possible when offering treatments to patients and allocating scarce medical
…show more content…
Example case:
1. a toddlers experiencing a very high fever, after being checked by a doctor, the doctor stated that only experienced inflammation and only provided space to stay in the hospital, after a few days there was a nurse checking my platelets and it turns out the child is exposed to dengue fever, and the next morning he died.
Analysis: omissions doctors in diagnosing diseases in patients suffering, so the handling is done is not appropriate and mengakibatan it the fatal case.
2. There's a patient who visits a clinic, where he complained of pain, after doctors diagnosed the disease of the patient, the doctor giving injections to patients, but arriving at the home of the patient experiencing a seizure.
Analysis: the doctor's negligence in providing action towards the patient, so the doses or injections provided does not correspond to the disease in a patient's suffering.
3. in a clinic, there was a mother who gave birth to her baby. One time a midwife accidentally cut off one of his fingers the baby but not doing further handling to the

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