Nurse Practitioners

1063 Words 5 Pages
The need for primary care services has increased drastically throughout the years, and is projected to rise in the up-coming years. Historically, the physicians primarily handled the majority of medical needs. However, with the broad scope of services that nurse practitioners are trained to provide, they are becoming higher in demand. Nurse Practitioners (NPs) are advanced practice nurses who have the ability to perform comprehensive physical or psychiatric exams. Nurse practitioners now practice in a variety of settings including clinics and hospitals. NPs are currently able to prescribe medicines in all 50 states. In twenty-six out of fifty states, they are also able to work independently (AANP, 2016). Table 1 shows the global characteristics …show more content…
The nurse practitioner would be an example of an APRN that would fall under the clinical category. Clinical is the term given to someone that works that works hands on with the patients. Examples of the non-clinical APRN include nursing informaticist and nurse educators. The Joint Commission sets standards that must follow to assure patient safety. These standards were initially created in 2002 as a means of assisting “accredited organizations in addressing specific areas of concerns in regards to improving patient safety. Being that nurse practitioners are APRNs that work in the clinical setting, it is imperative that these standards are upheld at all times. At South University, patient safety is an integral part of the teaching and learning process. Although the objective of educating nurse practitioners about patient safety is to decrease the opportunities for harm to come to both patients and the provider, there are still numerous common factors that remain. According to Barnsteiner …show more content…
Graduates will be prepared to enter in the work force with the necessary knowledge needed to improve the quality of patient care while maintaining a high level of safety in all areas. It has been stated that nurse educators often do not expose potential students to certain information in nursing because they are not always privy to needed information such as the medical reports from the Institute of Medicine and nurses “not receiving QSEN information” (American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 2011). Initiatives have been developed globally in order to make improvements in both nursing education programs and practice. According to Sherwood (2011), these initiatives include the “development of patient safety educational standards, incorporation of safety competencies into the ‘essentials documents’ of accrediting organizations, and curriculum mapping for spreading the competencies across the curriculum” (p. 8). In order to improve the culture of positive environments and patient safety for NPs and other APRNs, continued investigative discussions and research must be conducted. Society must be made aware of the value of the skill sets, knowledge, and medically valuable role of nurse practitioners and APRNs. Demonstrating the value of APRN care by implementing innovative models that leverage APRN skills, knowledge and experience can also be used as a strategy for

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