Nuremburg Laws Essay

998 Words 4 Pages
Germany, under the control of the National Socialist Party and Führer Adolf Hitler, experienced an influx of laws that attacked the German Jewry and, ultimately, anyone not identified as a member of the Aryan race. The political and social actions of the Nazis set out to correct the nation-wide problems that many believed were the result of granting Jewish citizens political power. Through the passage of the Nuremburg Laws, Germany took radical steps in ridding the Fatherland of the Jewish problem. The inferiority of the Jewish race plagued Germany as they prepared for war, and the leaders of the Nazi party found it necessary to eradicate this problem in whatever means necessary. These actions were sparked when Hitler spoke out in Mein Kampf …show more content…
Simply, “a Jew cannot be a citizen of the Reich. He has no right to vote on political affairs, he cannot occupy a public office” (Nuremburg). Being a member of the Jewry restricted any form of involvement in German life. The Jews were treated as an entirely different race of people in Germany, rather than just a different religion for a homogenous human being. Having any association with Judaism proved costly for any individual in society. These connections included having “(a) belonged to the Jewish religious community… (b) was married to a Jewish person…(c) is the offspring from a marriage with a Jew…(d) is the offspring of an extramarital relationship, with a Jew” (Nuremburg). Affiliations with the Jewish community signaled out millions of people in the German territories and proved catastrophic in coexisting with the new Nazi …show more content…
Under the impression that the Aryan race was supreme, the Nazi party used its political power to undermine all other races for the betterment of its own people. By identifying the Jewish population as the major enemy of the state, Nazi Germany was able to specify its political actions and seek to eliminate the Jewry in its entirety. The actions taken by the political leaders in pre-World War II Germany sought to eradicate the Jewish problem by removing them from society. Originally, this meant simply having the Jews leave the German state; but over time violent outbreaks by citizens paved the way for a much more sudden and permanent end to the Jewish issue. The ideas of one man ultimately sparked a nationwide elimination of a crisis that was hindering the Aryan race from being the strongest race on the planet. Germany needed to unite its people, this unification came in the form of removing Jews from society to make way for the powerful true Aryan. Racial segregation was going to happen one way or another in Germany, so long as the Jewry was eliminated and the Aryan was the lone member of Nazi

Related Documents