Nuclear Energy And Environment Essay

1732 Words 7 Pages
Despite being a relatively new source of energy, nuclear energy has emerged as one of the most influential energy sources. Nuclear power was developed in the 1950s after several years of intensive research on atoms, uranium, and radioactivity (Ferguson, 22). Initially, nuclear energy was mainly applied in the military field through the production of destructive weapons such as bombs. However, as years progressed, it became an essential component of industrial production. Nuclear energy is derived from nuclear reactions. The energy is then used to produce heat that is directed to steam turbines to facilitate production of electricity in nuclear power stations. Electricity generated from nuclear fission is processed through nuclear fission, which …show more content…
Nevertheless, the environmental impact of nuclear energy it considered mild in comparison to other sources of energy. This is because it does not the production of nuclear energy does not yield greenhouse gasses that are mostly associated with climate change. The lack of carbon emissions has in nuclear energy is one of the main reasons why champions of nuclear energy promote it as an environmentally friendly source of energy. Nonetheless, there are many other environmental issues associated with nuclear energy. This paper analyzes some of the most pertinent environmental problems that emanate from production and consumption of nuclear energy (Gieré and Stille, 38). The essay theorizes that nuclear energy’s impact on the environment originates from three main sources: the nuclear fuel cycle, impact of nuclear accidents, and from nuclear operations. Some of the most notable effects of nuclear energy on the environment are as outlined in the sections that …show more content…
This is because the emissions from coal-powered plants often contain huge chunks of uranium and thorium that come through the ashes disposes to the environment by coal power plants (Brown, 82). However, despite this environmental challenge, there are no legal restrictions for coal plants with regard to retaining their waste materials. Therefore, coal plants are considered more hazardous in terms of their environmental impact as compared to nuclear power plants when it comes to releasing radioactive materials into the environment. However, the amount of activity released from this method varies depending on the power plant, the legal framework available, and the performance of the power plant (Harrison and Hester, 72). Nevertheless, there is a need to monitor continuously the effluent emissions from nuclear power plants, especially in countries that lack strong legal mechanisms for providing checks and balances to power plants and holding them accountable for their environmental

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