Notion Of Self Reflective Practices

2240 Words 9 Pages
Notion of ‘Self’ – Reflective practices A recent search of literature on the notion of ‘self’ was conducted for this essay; in reviewing the literature various authors each giving their beliefs and concepts have written many theories and provided many discussions on ‘self’ over the years. However, to write about each of the authors would take some time, therefore within the essay, a few of the authors theories on what their beliefs and concept are to the view of self are included. The first part of the essay examine: (a) how the self is seen, structured, and defined; (b) the implications of self on the therapeutic process; (c) the counsellors’ self-awareness in assisting or inhibiting the therapeutic process; and (d) the role of the client’s …show more content…
The aim of this essay is to gain an understanding of how the implications of ‘self’ in the counselling environment may assist or inhibit the therapeutic processes. Firstly, the origins of ‘self’ came into a concept with Freud, (1965), who referred to it as the ‘ego’ then Mead (1934) who defined that the notion of self as the “I and the me”. The author Horney, (1950) with the concepts of the ‘real self’, ‘ideal self’, ‘actual self’. Horney saw the roles of real self as the possible self within a positive environment, the ideal self as the responder to a problem environment and the actual self in striving to be the person within the world. Carl Rogers, (1961) further explains the self-concept as having three different components: (a) The view you have of yourself (Self-image); (b) how much value you place on yourself …show more content…
Fosha, (1994) explains, ‘that positive experiences are often linked with negative ones’ and in experiencing the positive is to make one vulnerable and own the situation, but in owning the experience one can gain self-confidence and by gaining self-confidence the client can then grow and learn to create positive experiences, which lead to healing. Therefore, in learning to heal they promote the core state. Fosha, (1994) regards the core state as one that provides strength, clarity and resilient. She considers that once core state is reached effective therapy runs itself and the client is then linked with the true self. Hoffman, (2001 refers to the core state as being our natural self. Where he believes that in therapy, it where someone finally ‘gets it’ and believes “it’s about not how we get there, but that we can get there’. Therefore, core state is about the awakening of the true sense of

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