Northern Intervention Case Study

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Government Policies The government policies of the Northern Intervention consist of 4 major bills: the northern territory national emergency response bill, social security amendment, families, community, services, and other legislation amendment, and the appropriation bill of 2007. The legislation of the intervention presented many policies involving indigenous life. The legislation introduced alcohol restrictions for aboriginals as well as welfare reforms to end the flow of money towards substance abuse. Instead, the money was pushed towards child welfare. The intervention enforced school attendance among children on all aboriginal land by linking their attendance with the family’s income support. Children were brought in for compulsory …show more content…
The intervention was targeted directly towards the indigenous communities in the Northern Territory. Many believe that the Northern Territory Intervention fabricated the use of special measures in to pass legislation against aboriginal communities. During Prime Minister Howard’s eleven years in office, numerous reports about child abuse in indigenous communities had been published and received by his government, however no intervention had been created. Instead, only six days after the Little Children Are Sacred report was released, the legislation for the intervention was both created and passed through parliament. However, The legislation for the NTER never explicitly uses the words child or children. The bill focuses on policies for aboriginal land instead (Schokman & Vivian, 2009). The focus on land makes many believe the government is trying to grab aboriginal land (Stringer, 2007). The government had successfully achieved power over almost every fabric of aboriginal life. The intervention would not have achieved its goals without the suspension of the racial discrimination act. Many aboriginal people believed that if the RDA had to be suspended for the intervention, how the intervention be good for them and their families (“This is What We Said”, 2010)? Even with the recommencement of the RDA, the northern territory …show more content…
Tom Calma analyzes and comments on the northern territory intervention in his article It’s Not Our Dream. Calma states that the resources being used on the intervention can be harnessed and invested properly to solve the issues of aboriginal communities. The intervention could become a force of good to help Aboriginal people. The intervention needs to be taken from a human rights based approach, rather than through its current discriminatory values (Calma,

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