Government In North Korea

859 Words 4 Pages
In the northern portion of the Korean Peninsula, bordering the Korean Bay and Sea of Japan, North Korea makes up for more than half of the entire area. Twenty percent larger than South Korea, at 46,540 square miles, it is comparable to the size of Mississippi. The vast majority of the land consists of mountains and narrow valleys, making it so only about one-fourth of the country to has inhabitants. Due to the deforestation of the land for agricultural purposes, it is becoming more and more susceptible to flooding; usually following the late spring droughts. With nearly twenty five million people, North Koreas populace almost entirely consists of the majority of people live in the urban areas of the country, around three million of …show more content…
The country has been in a Communist one-man dictatorship since Kim Il Sung established the country with the help of Joseph Stalin on September 9th 1948. Throughout its history, one family, the Kim family, has been the only ones to rule North Korea. The majority political party is the Korean Workers Party and the two minority parties are the Chondoist Chongu Party and the Social Democratic Party; both of which are effectively under control of the Korean Workers Party. Legislation passes through a six hundred and eighty seven person body of government known as the Supreme People’s Assembly; however, they have almost no real power as they meet only a few days a year. The country’s legal system is somewhat based on Prussian law practices with both Japanese and communist influence as well. North Korea also developed and practices a ranking system of families that scales them from one to fifty on their level of loyalty to the nation, often the families who rank as disloyal are from having a member of the family that is a defector or refugee. The government punishes, tortures or kills any refugee or defector that is returned to them as well as their …show more content…
During World War II, American forces occupied the southern portion of Korea while Russia occupied the north. As such, the southern populace learns western culture and idealism and the north learns eastern European culture and communism idealism. In 1950, a Soviet-backed North Korea invaded South Korea, beginning “The Korean War”. An estimated two and half million people lost their lives during this war until finally in 1953 the armistice is signed, putting an end to the war. After the war, a two and a half mile wide and one hundred and fifty mile long demilitarized zone establishes just south of the border between North and South Korea roughly following the thirty-eighth parallel. Since then, it has essentially become a wildlife preserve, housing hundreds of fish, birds and other mammals, covered by forests and wetlands. Recently, Kim Jong Un has proclaimed the sixty year Korean War armistice void and begun cutting industrial ties with South Korea; many believe this is not a global threat but to prove his worth as a leader to his local

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