Rhetorical Analysis Of North American Slave Narratives

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APA Annotated Bibliography: Rhetorical Analysis

Andrews, W.L. (2004). North American Slave Narratives: An Introduction to the Slave Narrative. Documenting the American South. Retrieved from http://docsouth.unc.edu/neh/intro.html
In the North American Slave Narratives by William L. Andrews, he explains the importance of former slave narratives and how they contribute to American history. He addresses the importance of slave narratives and how they relate to racism in the United States. He supports African American slave narratives and their mission to serve as an eye opener for white readers. Andrew believes the narratives provide insight into the individual lives of slaves, and enhances communication about the subject. Andrews dives into the history of discriminating against African Americans. The author explains the commitment of white Americans to maintain their dominance in America. Andrews is a professor of English and literature. Winning several national awards and editorial honors, Andrews has become a
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The worksheet is from the National Endowment for the Humanities website, but it is not a creditable source. The source is hard to identify and the worksheet does not include a publishing date or author. Even though the worksheet is not a creditable source, it does provide some useful information. EDSITEment’s General Structure of Slave Narratives lists the four basic ingredients of a slave narrative. The first ingredient is the precipitating event, the situation that causes the slave to want to escape. The second ingredient is the path of escape; it is the part of the story when the slave chooses an escape route. The third ingredient is the events that happened along the way during the slave’s attempt to escape. Finally, the result of the situation is what happened after the slaves attempts to escape and where they ended

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