Gender Roles And Normalization

1247 Words 5 Pages
Normalizing is the social process by which values and ideologies become the ‘norm’. It relates to the concept of social construction because it is only by the complex social interaction of people in the society does a theory come to be normalized. Gender roles are an example of normalizing. By examining the concept of gender roles, it is concluded that it is a proposed hypothesis involving a group of communal and behavioural patterns that, within a precise culture, are widely considered to be collectively appropriate for individuals of a certain gender. The outlook of gender roles incorporates attitudes, actions, and character mannerisms associated with a specific gender within that culture. The aim of this essay is to examine and analyze …show more content…
While he does not argue its existence, the author makes the reader think about its meaning and role, as well as the ethics of the societies that pursue to demarcate it. As shown with Robert Ross and his rescue of the horses, Findley is trying to send us the message that Robert is representing a form of a social objection that might be incorporated as insane by some readers while others may consider it as an act of sanity in the face of the world’s madness. For Findley 's female characters, their general behaviour than a specific action that defines them as mad. However, it is possible to argue that Findley portrayed this madness as a direct effect of the gender inequality in a dominantly patriarchal social setting to critique the socially constructed essentialist set of gender roles. As seen throughout the events of the book, Mrs. Ross 's comprehension of her own defencelessness leads her to become lost, while Barbara d’Orsey appears lost from the beginning in her almost insane depiction of her socially assigned gender …show more content…
The issue of sports and gender is a debatable argument that encompasses several different points of view. I will limit my discussion about sports to hockey as it is considered as Canada’s national game. As discoursed in lecture, the concept of defining the border can be applied to hockey and gender. Men are in the center of the border which implies that they are fitting their socially assigned gender role. While women tend to be marginalized implying the social construct of gender expectations in society (Lecture 7). Mary Louise Adams states in The Game of Whose lives, “If hockey is life in Canada, then life in Canada remains decidedly masculine and white” (Adams 71). Mary Louise Adams here is entertaining the thought that even though women have achieved in the field of hockey, they are still not getting enough recognition. (Adams 71). This is linked to gender roles and personal identity in the sense that Canadians tend to link hockey to being Canadian (Adams 72). Women’s achievements are being ignored even in terms of media coverage. This is portrayed through the examples she gives throughout the article such as the difference in the media’s coverage for the Canadian men’s hockey team win over the Americans in 2002 and the women’s team acquiring the gold medal four days before. Adams is attempting to show us through the media’s coverage how double standards are

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