Nora's Marriage Analysis

2008 Words 9 Pages
In modern society, it is believed that a marriage is now more equal than before because of the increase in opportunities that women have in modern times. Women now have more economic freedom and are not just confined to the house. Women can get jobs and can discuss their problems openly in society. In addition, they are not confined to just one role in society and are allowed to choose whether they want to go down the path of motherhood. In the nineteenth century, marriage roles had been perceived as unequal because of how constricted a woman was in the eyes of society. At that time, women did not have monetary freedom, which meant that they did not have power in their lives. Therefore, women were only expected to bear children since they did …show more content…
This example of Nora being told to practice her dance shows how Nora’s dancing is even controlled by the male figures in her life. This idea is further supported when Torvald chastise Nora when she dances frantically by saying how she had forgotten everything he had taught her. The tree shown in the play is parallel with the state of mind and the situation that Nora is in. In the beginning, Nora had decorated the tree with multiple decorations, which can be seen as her being in a good state of mind and situation. However, the tree is stripped bare of its ornaments with burned-down candle ends on the branches in the start of Act two. With this in mind, the bare tree can be seen as Nora being in a bad state of mind and an uncomfortable situation now that she has to somehow stop her husband from finding out that she had gotten a loan from someone. This is important because it shows how Nora has a lack of economic power in her marriage since she had to stop her husband from finding out her …show more content…
This is supported even more by the fact that Nora had been trying to open the letterbox, but had failed in the end. It shows that Nora had been unable to escape from the patriarchal power and had no control in her life. In addition, the door leading toward Torvald’s study holds significance, and this is important because the study represents patriarchal power and authority, which shows how concentrated the power is in the marriage. Furthermore, another door that is important is the one that leads towards the outside world. This door is supposed to represent Nora’s liberation from her family and duties, and it is important because it shows how Nora had to exit out of her marriage to gain a voice. If Nora had more of a voice in her marriage, she would not have had to leave her

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