No One Says Quentin Tarantino's Dialogue Like Samuel L. Jackson Analysis

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No One Says Quentin Tarantino's Dialogue Like Samuel L. Jackson
Tiananmen Square. That's the only place people don't ask Samuel L. Jackson what they call a Quarter-Pounder with Cheese. Everywhere he goes Jackson finds fans quoting his quotes back at him, most notably from Quentin Tarantino's Pulp Fiction.

Every year, a new group of teenagers come of age and discover Pulp Fiction. In an interview with Jimmy Fallon, Jackson said "I've got fifteen-year-olds rolling up on me, 'Say what again!'" Once an older fan started doing the famous Ezekiel speech. "I'm like fuck, another one?" recalled Jackson. "When I turned around, it's Marlon Brando."

It's a testament to Jackson's ability to deliver quotable lines and Tarantino's ear for catchy conversational
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Pulp Fiction launched Tarantino's directing career as well. Diehard fans will return to Reservoir Dogs as a gem unappreciated in his time. But the 1994 instant cult classic was the first one that felt Tarantino-esque: sprawling with storylines, creative with structure, and full of remixed homages and influences. Roger Ebert reviewed it as one the best films of the year, "Pulp Fiction is charged up with the exhilaration of pure filmmaking, of colorful characters, of screwy dialogue and unbelievable situations, and violence and comedy."

George Siskel happened to agree with Ebert about Pulp Fiction. "I think that this guy is writing some of the most original dialogue since David Mamet." He went on to cite Jackson's and John Travolta's conversation about McDonald's in different
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His screenplay is touching on themes of what do things mean in language, in different cultures. Jackson plays it casually in a comedic rat-a-tat with Travolta.

The theme heats up as Vincent and Jules debate what a foot massage means. Is there always a hidden, sexual intention? But Tarantino avoids any stuffy semantics by putting it in a great vernacular phrasing. Jules says, "Ain't no fuckin' ballpark neither. Now look, maybe your method of massage differs from mine, but, you know, touchin' his wife's feet, and stickin' your tongue in her Holiest of Holies, ain't the same fuckin' ballpark, it ain't the same league, it ain't even the same fuckin' sport. Look, foot massages don't mean shit."

As soon as they enter the room, the hitman's tone changes from conversational to overly polite and friendly, communicating an unsaid tension. That is until Brett (played by Matthew Broderick) tells Jules they got into the deal with Marcellus with "the best intentions." The violence originally beneath the surface explodes as Jules shoots one of the

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