No Country For Old Men Analysis

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The world of crime fiction is much different from the real world. In the classical crime fiction world, characters take on specific archetypes that are central to the genre, and plot devices and storylines are repeated and revamped with each author or director that presents the story. Roles like the femme fatale, the hardboiled detective, the wandering daughter, the sap, and the “big man” or “crime boss” are repeated over and over again to the point where audiences are able to perfectly distinguish which character takes on which role. Plot devices such as the McGuffin are also present in multiple crime fiction stories. Situations dealing with stolen money, drug deals, serial killers, selfish spouses, and others have also been presented to …show more content…
The film tells the tale of an average joe named Llewelyn Moss who discovers a large sum of money that was left behind at the site of a drug deal gone wrong. This film is approached in a cat-and-mouse pursuit style as Llewelyn is pursued by a serial killer named Anton Chigurh who is hired to recover the stolen …show more content…
Film noir refers to any film that appears fatalistic or pessimistic in nature, and classic film noir is marked by distinct visual and plot elements such as chiaroscuro lighting, interesting camera angles, and average people getting caught up in criminal situations. “No Country for Old Men” meets many of these requirements, most prominently an average person involved in a crime-based, fatalistic story. Llewelyn Moss, our main character, is a welder and Vietnam War veteran and his wife, Carla Jean, is a housewife. These are two average people that come across a lot of money and end up in the pursuit of a criminal who takes their lives in the end. Our killer, Anton Chigurh, embodies the fatalistic element of the story. Chigurh’s logic is to kill anyone and everyone that he meets, and if he chooses to give you a chance to live, he asks that you call your life in a coin toss. Most often, the fate of the coin results in the death of the caller, but this logic allows him to kill his victims without feeling sympathy. The terrible fate of Chigurh’s victims and of the Moss’ contribute to the fatalistic and pessimistic nature that classifies this story as

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