Nixon Case Study Solution

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Nixon also thought that by seizing drugs at the borders it would also automatically reduce the supply of drugs available to the people of the United States. However, Nixon soon realized that even though they were able to seize a significant amount, it was not enough to discourage the drug cartels from smuggling it in. Since their profit margins are so high, they would need to seize more than two thirds of their supply to affect them (Nutt, p. 270). Additionally, drug traffickers would rather cut their profits than pass on any extra costs to their dealers and wholesalers. However, even if they did, dealers would reduce the purity to make up for the extra costs rather than increase their prices as it may result in losing customers (Nutt, p. 270). …show more content…
However, statistics show us that instead of there being a decrease, there was actually an increase in users from 1998 to 2008. With the number of users using Opiates increasing 34%, the number of users using Cocaine increasing 27% and the number of users using Cannabis increasing 8% (Nutt, p. 271). As well, by implementing stricter punishments, it didn’t actually target producers and dealers; rather, it targeted the users (Nutt, p. 271), which at the end of the day did not affect the drug trade at all. Since drug cartels and organizers are not being caught, or even if they are caught, they make more than enough money to hire lawyers and bribe officers to release them. So in turn, the people who are put in jail are the small scale dealers, the drug mules, and the drug possession convicts (Nutt, p. 272). In addition to targeting the wrong people- the drug addicts, it doesn’t deter them, as drug users are not given treatment in jail (Nutt, p. 272). Because of this, a cycle of addiction forms, as gaining a criminal record will only result in a loss of employment chances forcing them back into drugs as they are unhappy with their lives and getting high gives them false …show more content…
Since people were not able to seek help, the number of registered addicts in the UK has risen from an estimated 57 in 1955 to 300,000 in the span of 60 years after the outlaw of medical supervision to treat and manage their addiction (Nutt, p. 278). Through the criminalization of drugs, it not only stopped addicts from looking for treatment, but also stunted the development of treatments available for addicts. For instance, to help smokers deal with their addiction, E cigarettes and nicotine gum and patches were made to help wean the addicts off cigarettes, but there is no drug equivalent (Becker & Murphy,

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