Nietzsche's Nihilistic Theory

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The Nihilistic theory is one that disregards aspects of one's life that provide comfort and faith.
Beginning with de Beauvoir's outlook and nihilism, she sees the nihilist view as some cowardly way to avoid the unknown of life. No one knows what happens when they pass, this aspect frightens many and over the many millennia humans have come up with a plethora of ideas and theories as to what happens beyond this visual plane. These hypotheses gave and still to this day give people hope and guidance as well as meaning which governs their decisions and cultures. De Beauvoir completely rejects this idea as it intrudes on her other views such as oppression, which speaks of the ability to create your own path and make your own decisions, allowing
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Nietzsche was a strong believer that the serious man, one who devotes themselves to a religion is self-delusion as replacing science and nature with a "God" like figure clouds the human view and restricting their ability to craft their own existence. He also believes that the serious man gets rid of his freedom to trust and cling to subordinate values which may or may not even exist. Many believed Nietzsche to be a nihilist because if you do not give meaning to your in the shape of a god or higher power then you automatically are not living for anything which places you under the stigma of being a Nihilist. The Atheistic view is not and should not be considered as a nihilist, as because they do not believe in god does not strip their right or ability to search for new absolutes. Nietzsche states that it is we who give meaning and substance to our lives, we construct our own paths to follow. Nietzsche is a strong believer in personal freedom and the ability to gain our own perspective of the world. He also stated that a lack of absolute values enforced by religion does not constitute a total lack of values, Nietzsche believes that Nihilism is not just about the belief in the nothing but the destruction of everyone's something, whether it be intentional or not. Nietzsche was caught in a particular dilemma because it could be viewed …show more content…
Creating a comparison, De Beauvoir is a strong believer in a person's right to decide how they want to live, giving the three types of people she believes emerge from the world. In the same light, Nietzsche believes in personal freedom as well, though he does not agree with one way to live as he believes it restricts freedom which is the religious values view. De Beauvoir does not state in particular problem with this view, but Nietzsche has a problem with it and in a sense creates a contradiction where he is an advocate for freedom but denies the freedom of absolute values presented by religion, though it does raise the question of are these people actually free if their values and morals are given to them rather than learnt and achieved? Nietzsche and De Beauvoir shared similar opinions on Nihilistic views being nothing but destructive to those around them, the Nihilistic view aims to tear down one's ability to gain comfort and ambition from life as Nihilism is the nothingness. In De Beauvoir explanation she mentions the adventurer one who embraces the ambiguity of life and does not attach himself to any particular value, view, or moral. Nietzsche somewhat fits this description in the sense where he lives his life in the attempt of creating his own path and founding his own morals and values. De Beauvoir and Nietzsche share

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