Nicomachean Ethics: Aristotle's Outline Of A Good Life

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Aristotle wrote his ethical theory Nicomachean Ethics in 340 BC. Nicomachean ethics is centered around happiness. He believes that a good life is one that consists of virtues – both moral, such as courage, and intellectual, such as science – which leads to eudemonia, or happiness. In Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle designs an outline of a good life, and uses this outline to shape the common good. A good life, is one of virtue and happiness. In his design, Aristotle states that virtue is manifested through an individual’s actions. Aristotle contends that in order to obtain moral and intellectual virtues, reason and the aim of happiness must be in accordance. An aspect of virtuous living is practical reasoning, which is the ability to decipher …show more content…
He writes that the actions of virtue – which each individual chooses for the sake of achieving happiness, are subjective to the individual. All men regard a good life as one where happiness is the primary purpose (Aristotle, p. 1). While men of various statures agree that living well and success is connected to happiness, they all debate on the identity of happiness, giving different accounts (Aristotle, p.1). Happiness will be accounted by every person differently because it based on their necessities. For example, a sickly individual will find happiness in health, and a poverty-stricken individual will find happiness in wealth; whereas, a man, that is content in wealth and health would give another interpretation of happiness (Aristotle, …show more content…
When Aristotle spoke of particulars, he was referring to detail, he was stating that a man of practical wisdom pays attention to detail more so than the entirety of a condition. One must be able to detect the truth in all situations. In the beginning of his writing, Aristotle advises the reader to critically analyze the information s/he receives and releases. Aristotle states that during the lifetime of a virtuous and happy individual, s/he forms rational and practical decisions that are best for themselves and other human beings, as it will ultimately have an effect on the lives of

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