New Immigrants In The 19th Century

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Late nineteenth century marked a new era for America. Because of the country’s rapid economic growth and industrial revolution, millions of immigrants from all around the world made the long journey to the United States. The “land of opportunity” as they called it, offered them a greater chance to have a better life. However, the vast majority of the “new” Americans faced an uphill battle for survival. Low wages, awful living conditions and racial discrimination took a toll on many of the immigrants.
During the nineteenth century the United States saw the biggest population increase in their history. Many immigrants flooded the United States with hopes of a better life and many others were brought in by contract labor agreements offered by

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