Essay On New Haven

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New Haven, a city in Connecticut, is notable for undergoing major changes during the city’s existence. It doesn’t offer images glamorous and lavish lifestyle like major US cities, or the dream of someone coming into this city and having it change their entire life. Nonetheless, it offers the idea of the American Dream, New Haven is a city where one can own a house a among the most modern and sophisticated infrastructures. Its history of development and redevelopment is an uncommon story, consequently New Haven has been examined multiple times because it has a unique urban renewal experience. However, the implications of New Haven’s urban renewal projects have gone unheard and unforeseen by the common citizen. The documentary titled The Hill depicts the story of a New Haven neighborhood, the Upper Hill, struggling to save their homes as the city of New Haven targets the neighborhood as a site for a gentrification project. The Hill shows how the Upper Hill residents challenge the city of New Haven, as they discover the true intentions of the city’s land-use …show more content…
Angotti would describe this idea of claiming eminent domain of the Upper Hill as an unfair and unjust situation. He explains that eminent domain affects small businesses and communities of color that get removed for hospitals, schools, park, highways, institutions or infrastructures that might be seen as justifiable for public benefit (Angotti). The push out of The Hill represents the oppression of people color is still evident in present day in our institutions and social systems represented in the racial inequalities patterns in the US (Bonilla-Silva, 43). Although slavery or segregation is no longer legal, people of color continue to experience racialized social systems in covert ways through institutional racism. That is what happened to the people who lived on The

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