New England Colonies Dbq Analysis

Improved Essays
Faustino, Yeelena 1A
10/12/15
DBQ
Influenced by the Puritans, from 1630 through the 1660’s the four New England colonies, Massachusetts Bay Colony, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Hampshire , were experiencing large growth in their political, economic, and social systems. Socially, the Puritans impacted the colonies religious views and community. Economically they believed in thrift and godliness and politically they leaned towards a self-governing congregations groups. The puritans greatly impacted the social, economic, and political status of the New England colonies by making their community close together.
The Puritans brought the idea of working together and centering the community on the church, school, and government. In Document B, the image displays a town map showing how the colonists valued the church, school, and town hall, “ wee must be knit together, in this worke, as one man” (Document A) John Winthrop states in Document A, the puritans valued living in a tight-knit community and working together,
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John Cotton, a theologian, explains how human beings are naturally corrupt thus, they need limited access to governmental power, "Let all the world learn to give mortal men no greater power than they are content they shall use” (Document H). In favor of this, Roger Williams was a religious freedom advocate he was banished from Massachusetts bay colony for speaking about the corruption on the colonies and later started the Rhode Island Colony, he states “God requireth not a uniformity of religion to be enacted and enforced in an civil state”( Document F). But religious toleration was seen as taboo in the colonies, “He that is willing to tolerate any religion or discrepant way of religion besides his own[…] either doubts of his own or is not sincere in it” (Document G). The complex views on religion amongst the puritans have influenced the politics in the New England

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