Neursurgery: My Experience At Johns Hopkins Hospital

889 Words 4 Pages
When I was 5, I fell into a bag of glass and gashed my leg open. Crazy, right! Well, the accident ended in being carried to the hospital with a blood soaked towel wrapped around my knee. It was eight at night when I entered the emergency room and was placed into a wheel chair. The pain in my leg was great, but my curiosity to peek under the reddening towel was greater. I waited patiently for the nurse to unwrap my leg. I had not seen my leg since it was initially sliced. She pulled back the towel and I was instantly amazed. The first words I said were, “Wow! It looks like brains”, (most likely the origin of my interest in neurosurgery). All the nurses in the triage giggled, one even commenting that she had never saw a child so fascinated. Eventually …show more content…
I decided to apply to an internship at Johns Hopkins Hospital offered to high-school students interested in medicine. I was accepted and assigned to a surgical ward that performed on a variety of operations. With so many surgical options to observe, I often missed lunch to watch my favorites, which were more fulfilling and satisfying than anything I would eat in the hospital cafeteria. My initial mind-set when entering a surgical room was not on the patient themselves, rather the objective and logistic of the operation. In contrast, in passing through the waiting room, I always sympathized with the anxious families pacing for good news. In effort to provide some peace to their dismays, I would hand out beverages and occupy the restless children stuck with their parents with board games and coloring. While both experiences were rewarding, I still wanted to go above and beyond and research the diseases I encountered daily emphasizing current and developing treatments. Reflecting back, I learned a lot about the importance of patient and family care, the intellectual endurance needed to be a successful surgeon, and the problem-solving development that is only perfected after years of experienced training; all lessons I have carried with me to college and …show more content…
This summer The University of Pennsylvania spontaneously offered me an internship, with only three days to decide and transition from my MCAT prep dedicated summer to the position. I knew my MCAT scores would be affected by my decision because it limited the time I needed to master the pacing aspect of the test, however the internship offered the more enriched and analytical environment I craved. The extent of my internship included managing two projects; mine and that of my mentor who left for Germany. Refusing make a bad impression in his absence, I invested my free time in understanding our research topics. The trial and error development of the multi-stain protocol, which would be used to analyze atherosclerotic plaque progression, exactly reflected everyday medicine. Often in medicine, patient care resembles trial and error, however research helps to limit that aspect, so that the effects of misdiagnosis and mistreatments are lessened. Patients entrust doctors to be able to rationally analyze a situation, collaboratively think of ways to assess a problem and good discernments about the patient’s overall well-being. These skills, relatable to my research, I hope to contribute when I become a doctor. Research has strengthened my ambition and my ongoing childhood fascination in medicine, something I plan to continue

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