Nervosa Eating Behavior

1393 Words 6 Pages
Mayer, Schebendach, Bodell, Shingleton and Walsh (2012) completed a study to learn about eating behaviors in Anorexia Nervosa (AN) patients before and after the patients with AN were able to stabilize their weight, which meant the act of keeping their weight from fluctuating. Anorexia Nervosa was defined by Mayer et al. as “a psychiatric illness that is characterized by low weight, an intense fear of gaining weight, and the fear of fat; as core symptoms of this illness, these fears lead to significant dietary restriction and weight loss” (p. 290). Mayer et al. defined eating behaviors as any behavior in relation to eating that may be uncharacteristic: restricting (limiting what they eat), binging (indulging, or eating excessively), and purging …show more content…
(2012) had eighteen AN patients and fifteen people in the healthy control group complete the study. The AN patients completed the study twice, once right after inpatient admission and again after their Body Mass Index (BMI) was more than or equal to 19.5. BMI was defined as a measurement found by taking the participants’ weight in kilograms and dividing it by their height in meters squared. Mayer et al. used this measurement to determine whether the participants could be categorized as underweight, normal or overweight by using a range of numbers for each category. In women, a normal BMI was between 18.5 and 24.9, which was why Mayer et al. used 19.5 as a starting point. Mayer et al. also studied the healthy control group twice, nearly two to three months apart. Treatment for the AN patients consisted of normalizing their weight and creating proper eating patterns in a structured behavioral program. AN patients had their weight monitored weekly, and had to gain at least one kilogram per week. “The AN patients’ had to intake a certain amount of calories each day, beginning at 1800 kcal per day. Every other day, the AN patients’ intake increased by 400 kcal until the AN patients finally reached a total of 3000 kcal per day in food and 720 kcal per day in nutritional supplements like Ensure Plus” (p. 291). The weight gain phase continued until the AN patients reached ninety percent of their ideal body …show more content…
(2012) were unable to generalize the results of their research because the sample was too small and subject to attrition. The sample group was not broad enough to generalize the results and say that AN patients’ eating behaviors are the same before and after treatment because Mayer et al. only had eighteen AN patients and fifteen people in the healthy control group who completed the study. The sample was biased due to attrition because at the beginning of the study, there were twenty-five AN patients, two of which were boys, and later had seven AN patients and five people from the healthy control group unable to continue the study. Too many participants were unable to complete the study causing the effectiveness of the research to be reduced. The study also did not clearly state the genders of the participants, and we have no idea whether the two boys completed the study or not, yet Mayer et al. consistently referred to patients with AN in their study. It cannot be possible to refer to all patients with AN because the sample was not large enough to include all ethnicities, genders, or ages to the conclusion. Ages, genders, nationalities, or ethnicities of the participants were not stated, and therefore, Mayer et al. should not be able to make an overall conclusion for all patients with AN. The sample was too small and subject to attrition, which caused a conclusion that discussed how all AN patients in the world have the same eating behaviors as the eighteen AN

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