Dhamma Brothers Film Analysis

Good Essays
The underlying problem of the prison industrial complex will be defined through the prison industrial complex to exploit lower class citizens through capitalism, yet within the context of spiritual liberation of vipassana mediation as defined in Changing from Inside, Dhamma Brothers, and Doing time, Doing Vipassana. The film Dhamma Brothers, the internal spiritual freedom of Buddhism is analyzed within the context of prisoners of the prison industrial complex as a form of capitalistic oppression of lower class citizens in America. These films expose the primary theme of prison incarceration as a direct result of a hegemonic capitalistic system, which has exploited and detained increasing populations of inmates in this system. The Buddhist …show more content…
“Everything in life, you have to pay for, one way or another. In my life—its instant—I do something wrong and its there—pow!” (22:40). This aspect of the prisoner life in third world nations defines the neocolonialism of modern capitalism as a form of marginalizing members of the lower classes, which Buddhism offers a spiritual freedom from this ideology. Since many prisoners in Doing time, Doing Vipassana are forced into minimum or no-wage labor, they rely on mediation to relieve themselves of the burden of their incarceration in such a capitalistic system. Many of the inmates of people of color, but it shows that Buddhist meditation techniques provide a spiritual and mental counter to the materialism of capitalism, which got many of these prisoners into the prison system. The film Dhamma Brothers also defines the impact of vipassana mediation on four incarcerated men that seek out spiritual liberation from the capitalistic effects of the American prison industrial complex. The alarming level of American prisoners of African American and minority descent defines the over focus of Buddhism as an outlet for life-term inmates serving their time in these institutions. Dhamma Brothers defines the use of vipassana method of mediation to relieve the burden …show more content…
The filmmakers decided to experiment with vipassana techniques in order to see the effects of Buddhist spirituality in devolving the effects of materialism and capitalistic conditioning of the inmates: “How the could vipassana course be conducted without compromising security. We had to somehow integrate security right into the vipassana program” (Changing from Inside 14:37). This integration of Buddhist spiritual principles into a 1—day program defines the eventual success of the program to help inmates learn healthy lifestyles choices and the vipassana mediation techniques as a form of internal liberation from such a all-encompassing system of punishment and incarceration. These aspects of documentary filmmaking are also part of the Dhamma Brothers and Doing Time films, since they define the oppressive conditions of being in the prison industrial complex, and the necessity for internal spiritual liberation from a dysfunctional system of imprisonment. In many ways, the positive effects of vipassana mediation illustrate the importance of Buddhist spiritual principles and mediation as a form of internal liberation from the oppression of capitalistic systems of the prison industrial complex in the 21st

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Lastly, the greed of the bourgeoisie will lead to the proletarians being physically be enslaved. Marxist theories see Heart of Darkness as a work in which class relations are truthfully and realistically portrayed. Thus the novel displays the evils of capitalism and how the stark class division between the rich and the poor is created by imperialism, and how that is capable to destroy a…

    • 1037 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Johnson writes about the matrix of capitalist domination. In this section he tries to explain the complexities of privilege and how privileges relate to one another. Johnson takes us back to when capitalism first began to take hold in the world and the anatomy of the working class. He explains how a variety of terrible circumstances adds to the terrible history that has plagued the history of capitalism. In Johnson’s book Privilege, Power, and Difference he addresses the…

    • 836 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Sinclair uses a repetitive pattern in the story by describing the sickness and injury's of the immigrant workers, to point out that capitalism is hardest on the very young, old, weak and the sick. Corruption is evident throughout the story and is exhibited several times. A good example offered by Sinclair, is the political vote-buying schemes, political bribes, and the bribing of politicians and law enforcement in return for them to look the other way as the businessmen were exploiting the immigrant workers. Sinclair compares socialism with capitalism, believing that capitalism is a contradictory, corrupt ideology that will inevitably be overcome by socialism. Capitalists are clearly portrayed as the source of social inequality while socialism is depicted as the ideal doctrine that will result in the salvation of humanity.…

    • 1117 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The power and money obsessed bourgeoisie is the cause of the revolution. Marx believed that capitalism contained the seeds of its own destruction. Every upper class needs a lower class which therefore in turn means capitalism needs a lower class and with the bourgeoisie exploiting the working class Marx knew it would lead to resentment causing the proletariats to revolt. The bourgeoisie were the antagonists for the revolution of the…

    • 797 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    According to the book “Race to Incarcerate” by Marc Mauer, Mauer argues that America has used prison to punish the people and a racial disparity in our justice system is happening. In favor of Mauer is the author of “Torture in U.S. Prisons” by Bonnie…

    • 2271 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Ex Convicts Case Study

    • 946 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Jabez Koh, an ex-convict that served 16 years in prison, shared that he is often exploited by his employers and received unfair treatment in his workplace despite his decent qualifications. Mr. Koh’s story is not an isolated case, ex-convicts are often stigmatized in their workplace, faced difficulties in securing a job or limited to only low-paying jobs. This is a problem for Singapore, as we faced a critically decreasing workforce size, with human resources as our greatest assets. Manpower Minister Lim Swee Say cited the ‘1+2=3’ formula to highlight that growth in our workforce and productivity is vital to attaining a sustainable economic growth. By denying ex-convicts a second chance, not just in employment, but also in opportunities to better-paying jobs that can empower them to pull themselves out of poverty, we are short-changing Singapore with a smaller pool of productive workers and increasing Her liabilities with more poor people.…

    • 946 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In the United States many of the prisons systems use the prisoners as a work force for commodity goods. The supervisors of these prisons claim that it is only to make up for the cost of the prisoner and therefore they are supporting themselves. However prisons are state funded and the money made in these markets go directly in the pockets of the prison supervisors. In The Rich Get Richer and the Poor Get Prison dictates the failure of the war against crime and how the systems of oppression and greed for money incarcerates more black males at a higher rate. The authorities are the oppressors and any form of revolt will be punished and thus the prisoner continued to be stuck in the system of oppression.…

    • 2525 Words
    • 11 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Why I Want To Be In Jail

    • 627 Words
    • 3 Pages

    I want to write on this topic because I want to educate myself on why we are wasting tax dollars on people that are becoming less of a human being by being in jail. What needs to change to make them able to go back into society and be a productive member of it. What do you already know about this topic? • From what I’ve read and the TV shows I’ve watched I know that the inmates are never really doing anything productive with their prison sentence. All they have to do is wake up and just wander around and not have…

    • 627 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    George Orwell displays the way the government affects people in a very cruel and dark way. Orwell has the reader imagine that they must be tortured and punished for not believing in the same things as their authority. Orwell portrays torture to be something good and necessary to make someone listen and cooperate with you. In the end, the main focus of 1984 would be that having power to just have power is the main form of control. When you compare this to Brave New World the reader can notice that Aldous Huxley has a more laid back, but controlled society.…

    • 1576 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The division of labor has been a main way to organize society due to the the economic dependency that society has forced onto people in order to justify the status of the elite class. The foundation of economic structures functions to secure and maintain the structure of domination, because of it’s ability to subject a certain population, in this case poor people of color, in order to develop the country through forced cheap labor. Smith idolizes the breakup of labor, because it relates to the notion of people not having the potential to full power, and therefore become reliant on economic structures for their survival. Smith highlights the division of labor as a way to get workers to perfect their one task, in order to increase and expedite mechanisms of production in order to achieve “universal opulence” ( Smith 1776: 2012:59), which enforces the objectification of workers, whereas humans are no longer viewed as a necessity to the functions of society. Rather, workers are solely recognized for their labor as it is valued and exploited for the economic structures to thrive.…

    • 1112 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays