Tension In Dead Poet's Society

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In ‘Dead Poet’s Society’, Neil’s death causes conflict to arise, creating tension within the Welton Academy community. This amount of tension instigated a thorough scrutiny of the members in the community which lead to the expulsion of students, and firing of teachers. In spite of what is shown in the movie, it is evident that Mr. Perry, Mr. Keating and Neil are all equally guilty for Neil’s suicide. These characters hold strong affiliations with Neil and have interfered with his emotions and thoughts throughout the movie. The father of Neil, Mr. Perry has truly pragmatic beliefs and forces his son to study and to focus primarily on school. This is something that Neil has no interest in. In contradiction to Mr. Perry’s unrelenting views, Mr Keating teaches and inspires Neil to follow his dreams and encourages him to confront his father. [Add final sentence].

Mr. Perry is known for his relentlessness and putting unnecessary pressure on Neil, forcing him to study and get a well-paying job, ultimately playing a part in his death. He does this by discouraging Neil to pursue his acting career and is against letting his own son do what he feels satisfied with doing. This is shown when Mr. Perry tells Neil that he is “going to military school”, so he can focus on his studies and not get distracted by “this acting business”. This scene is portrayed as the camera angle facing up towards Mr. Perry, making him seem bigger and more
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Perry, Mr. Keating and Neil all have very strong personalities. The opinions of the characters clash and Neil is left with seems like the only option left for him. Mr. Perry wants the best for Neil, but doesn’t take the time to understand his son. On the contrary, Mr. Keating inspires Neil to live a purposeful life and to stand up to his father. Neil doesn’t feel he can be happy in life, and sees no hope for the future, thus taking his own life. Therefore, these three characters were all equally responsible for the tragic ending of Neil

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