Technopoly: The Surrender Of Culture To Technology

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In the works written by Neil Postman “Technopoly: The Surrender of Culture to Technology”, Stephen Lansing’s “Priests and Programmers” and Vandana Shiva’s “Biopiracy” growing technologies along with more restrictive laws can shape an individual’s freedoms as well as things that would otherwise seem “free” as in food. Postman argues a world with an increase in technology could undermine the morals within humanity and end up controlling humanity as an end result. Lansing’s research analysis is based on past, adapting systems, such as the Balinese water temples before and after the Green Revolution. Shiva contends the ramifications of biopiracy, the piracy on biological products to be financed by businesses, and how those ramifications of this biopiracy can impact an …show more content…
What if we lived in a world where it was ruled by technology? Ruled in the extent where it was everywhere, controlled most things, was the authoritarian rule of the land? This is just what Postman addresses as technopoly, in his work titled “Technopoly: The Surrender of Culture to Technology”. The author explains just how influential technology can be on a society, especially if this aforementioned technology begins wielding more strength and power; signs one are already exposed to. Technopoly would heavily impact society, as we know it, if it was to be completely realized. What we were once able to control would be controlled by technology. Humans will then begin to, for a lack of a better term, glorify technology. One’s wouldn’t have to think for themselves anymore, technology could take over that feat for us. Postman in particular offers education as an example to this notion. As in our current society, an individual learns from writing, arithmetic, history are becoming replaced with technology. More within the educational system students are presented with and taught to learn with visuals, presentations in order to delve emotions one couldn’t quite be able to procure without

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