Hip Hop Influence

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Being the most popular and controversial genre & topic across the world, hip-hop sums up the problems in today’s society whether it’s dealing with teen rebellion, African-Americans interaction with police officers, poverty, or even injustice. Hip-Hop is the voice of the people in an assertive way, it has positive influences as well as some negatives. However the negative Influences of Gang Violence and The Encouraging of Unprincipled Behavior can be solved by Community leaders mentoring the youth to teach them what’s fake about certain hip hop lyrics, parents taken the responsibility for what their kids are listening to, and Rappers making their lyrics either more positive or cutting back on the graphic content.
The birth of hip-hop was started
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Gang violence in Hip-Hop was basically, rappers beefing over the flag they represent. The 2 most common gang violence was between Crips and Bloods. Examples of rappers claiming their set are: Snoop Dog who reps The Crips and The Game who reps the Bloods. Hip-Hop has been blamed for the violence from gangs. Even though Gang violence has been around way longer than Rap, it is still be said that Hip-Hop fuels and evolves it, because of the lyrics from the songs. This is why when African-Americans youths killing each other the blame is usually on Hip-Hop and said that it influenced the teens to participate in destructive behavior. Especially now since gangs has become more modernized and open and you see more rappers making themselves seem like they are really doing what there acting, many youths don’t realize that most rappers don’t live what their rapping …show more content…
From the violence talked about in the songs, to drug usage, and even the disrespect towards women, Hip-Hop lyrics have recently showed more of a negative impact than any other genre because of these things associated within the songs. Drug usage is a big thing with a lot of rappers encouraging the use of marijuana. The top 2 common is Snoop Dogg and Wiz Khalifa (who has his own strain of weed). Both of these artist are proud Smokers and even made a sound dedicated to it called “Young Wild and Free” there is also Afroman who did the song “Because I got high”. The topic of weed is already controversial as it gets, but that on top of hip-hop is in a whole new ordeal. Most people are even more disgusted towards hip-hop just because they say it influences “drug abuse”. Due to rappers who are on very dangerous drugs such as lean, an example of that rapper is the GOATTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTT LIL WAYNE. Who is a lean user even though is has had multiple seizures. Fredo Santana who has been hospitalized also Gucci Mane (who is a former lean drinking) had gain a large amount of weight due to his consisted

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