Negative Effects Of Medical Institutions On Society

Improved Essays
A new way to think about institutions

When we think of institutions, we often think about the positives associated and how institutions can help people. However, despite what we often think, institutions can have a negative effect on individuals. Our society relies heavily on institutions, particularly the medical and educational institutions, however they often fail us, and as a result, negatively impact individuals. This is highlighted in ‘Whose life is it anyway?’, image 1 and the tragic incidents at Bankstown hospital involving two babies. By using these examples, i hope to persuade you why institutions can have negative effects on individuals.

I strongly believe that ‘Whose life is it anyway?’, a play written by Brian Clark, brings up
…show more content…
During the meeting, Ken gets upset by Mrs Boyle’s professionalism as she does not display the ‘normal’ human emotions towards him. It is through the lack of emotions, that causes Ken to feel like a patient, instead of a human which emphasises how medical institutions can have negative effects on individuals. The negative tone of “the very exercise of your so-called professionalism makes me want to die” (Page 34), displays how Ken strongly despises how Mrs Boyle treats him and causes us, the audience to side with him. He points out how her professional detachment is useless as it just causes him to feel even more determined to die. I believe that Mrs Boyle, like many other health practitioners are rigid and are unable to express how they feel due to their professional detachment, which is why i believe that institutions can have negative effects on individuals. Similarly in image 1 and the current event, institutions have failed to provide assistance, and in Ken’s case failed to listen to his wishes. As a result, this has caused Ken to accept the fact that he will never be treated as a human if he remains in the hospital and therefore makes him more determined to end his life, which is why i believe institutions can have negative effects on …show more content…
I believe that human error and untrained staff were the main reasons why this tragedy occurred and is why institutions can have negative effects on individuals. Medical institutions are supposed to be there for us however how can people continue to trust these institutions when they can get something so incredibly wrong that it can kill someone and cause permanent brain damage. As a result of the ‘accidents’ caused by the institution, families have been negatively affected and will have to endure pain and suffering in the long term. Investigations claimed that the hospital failed to check and inspect the gas, which makes us question whether the institution is fit to provide services to the community. Similarly, in “Whose life is it anyway?” and image 1, this current event also addresses how institutions fail to assist individuals which further reinforces how institutions can have negative effects on

Related Documents

  • Superior Essays

    In addition, the doctors and nurses felt that they were superior to their patients and had more power and control since they were employed by the hospital; therefore, they thought it was not necessary to consult with the patients or their families about their decision of who would be evacuated first. From this scene, I learned that health care providers should never dehumanize their patients under any circumstances. In addition, health care providers should treat patients with respect and…

    • 2030 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Manipulation is a strong and powerful skill. If it is not addressed, especially in a facility holding the mentally disabled, it can lead to grave consequences. The type of manipulation featured in “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” by Ken Kesey is an example that can be seen prominently throughout history. In the book, Nurse Ratched manipulated the patients of the ward to her benefit. The patients were not properly cared for and were abused physically and mentally.…

    • 791 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    I am a Student Paramedic with the East Of England Ambulance NHS Trust and this essay will look reflectively at an incident I attended during the course of my duties. The assignment will reflect on the moral, ethical and legal aspects of pre-hospital care that challenged me during this particular emergency. Reflective practice is a requirement of the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC, 2014). Rolfe, Freshwater and Jasper (2001) state, “we learn by doing and realising what came of what we did”.…

    • 661 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Dr. Adewalle Troutman promotes the aspects of responsibility and social determinants linked together, because there is only so much that can be controlled within your social status. You can be very responsible and hardworking, yet if the job you have doesn’t give you the means to take proper care of yourself you may end up stuck. For instance, if you’re in a rough neighborhood you cannot control the potential dangers, in turn increasing your stress and ultimately negatively impacting your health. In some cases, the laws and policies that determine the wellness of an individual are designed to work against certain groups within a community. Lack of insurance combined with poverty often results in the shortened life span of those individuals (Borst, 2010).…

    • 1037 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Throughout American society, the citizens believe that they have rights that protect their free will. The citizens assume that every right given to them is for protection. They do not realize that a right can harm them. Truthfully, some of the rights that are given to the people by the governemnt are not benefical. In A Crime of Compassion by Barbara Huttmann, the author expresses her opinion towards the right of being revived.…

    • 900 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    No Mas Bebes Reflection

    • 598 Words
    • 3 Pages

    I was speechless by the inhumane practices in the healthcare system. This story was so enriching and thought provoking. I had a perfect image that the hospital was a place for doctors to heal patients’ illness and promote long term health. Instead, I learned problems exists within hospitals that prevent equal healing. I learned these women will be forever scar by having their rights violated.…

    • 598 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Love And Diane Analysis

    • 952 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The impact that financial hardships can have are on full display, as they can be preludes, or in some cases the cause of, a wealth of potential familial issues, including abandonment and drug use, which can have far-ranging repercussions on several generations of a family. The issues on display in the film give way to questions and concerns about the overarching infrastructure that is meant to support the families that face these problems. The usage and effectiveness of social services in this film, or lack thereof, can make one posit questions about the moral direction of the country. How could the U.S., a country known as, “the land of opportunity”, do so little to help those without these opportunities? Statistics reflect that it continues to be the same demographics that are affected by the cyclical problems, which can be an indication of external forces that continue to inhibit people’s abilities to flourish in society.…

    • 952 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Test Item #2: The definition of the word autonomy means to be self-determined or to have free will. Patients, who are competent and are of an appropriate age, all have the ability to be autonomous when it comes to making decisions about their healthcare.…

    • 843 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    One mechanism to counteract the impact of structural violence and mistreatment in the ILLC institution is protest. An example of this is when Yessenia belts herself and her wheelchair to a sapling at the building's front entry holding signs that say, “They abuse and kill children here” (Nussbaum 259) in protest after Teddy’s death with other patients by her side. However, this method did not bring any justice to the protesters because even though they landed a story on the Channel 5 news, Howard Anderson, an ILLC board member, counters by saying “Does...any rational person…really believe our society would be able to function if places like ILLC were suddenly no longer available? Imagine the death rate under those circumstances” (Nussbaum 261-262). Here, we see the recurring theme of being “rational” by the hierarchy to justify any action or event no matter how tragic or inhumane it is, and they continue to repress the outcry of the oppressed group.…

    • 1229 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    There is a quote that says “If you fail to plan, you plan to fail” (unknown). Regardless of the circumstances, Memorial and the staff of Life Care had an obligation to these patients as healthcare personnel. Although they were operating under extreme conditions, low on supplies, sustenance, and mental and physical strength, it was not a time to drop the ball. Had they followed the Nursing code of ethics they could had protected and advocated for the nine residents that they failed.…

    • 1046 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Humans are a complex species. Emotions define who we are. Our ability to bond with others with sentiment and compassion is what makes us human. A human without emotions is meaningless. What is the point of life if you do not have passion?…

    • 1082 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    It is clear that the utmost importance in any medical context is the relationship between the healthcare practitioner and the patient. The duty of a physician is to adhere to certain principles of medical ethics namely the principles of respect for autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, and justice. By examining the case study involving Dr. Nancy Morrison, one can observe that these principles are often ambiguous when referring to the issue of whether she committed voluntary active euthanasia or nonvoluntary active euthanasia. Thus, the thesis will aim to exemplify that ultimately Dr. Nancy Morrison was culpable for her actions. To give some context to the issue, Paul Mills was a 65-year-old individual suffering from terminal esophageal cancer.…

    • 1467 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Every nurse has the opportunity to make a positive impact on their patients and the nursing profession on a daily basis through the use of advocacy (Tomajan, 2012, Abstract section). Advocacy plays a significant role in nursing and must be demonstrated to give patients a voice when they are unable to express themselves to protect the patient’s safety and well-being. Throughout the novel A Nurse’s Story, Tilda Shalof actively demonstrated advocacy regarding her patients, which enhanced her qualities as a nurse. Advocating for a patient improves the quality of their stay at a health care facility and increases the likelihood for the patient to utilize health care services in the future. It is important for nurses to work together as a team to…

    • 787 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The film call Wits was released in 2006 and it portray the experience of a 17th century English poetry professor name Vivian Bearing who was diagnose with stage IV ovarian cancer. Dr. Kelekian was her clinician and researcher who proposed for her to receive an experimental eight course treatment of chemotherapy that was the only inform option provided to her. As the next few months are spent in the hospital, Vivian addresses the experiences that she encounters as patient whose dehumanized and view as a subject rather than a human being. Conflict of Dual of loyalty The most controversial and Ethical dilemma that she experienced was the Conflict of Dual of loyalty to patient.…

    • 820 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Movie Wit

    • 1316 Words
    • 6 Pages

    The movie Wit portrays the gripping trials of a patient with terminal cancer and the ethical dilemmas health care professionals must face when treating such a disease. It follows the journey of Vivian Bearing, a middle-aged English professor who is suddenly diagnosed with stage four ovarian cancer. She agrees to undergo an experimental treatment conducted by Dr. Kelekian and Dr. Posner where she will receive a vigorous dosage of chemotherapy in attempt to combat the growing cancer cells. However, there are several unseen consequences to such treatment that evolve throughout the plot. The method of care and the physician-patient relationship play a vital role in communicating the problems of today’s health care system.…

    • 1316 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays