19th Century Japanese Internment Camps

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Throughout history of the United States, whenever there was a new “wave” of immigrants they became targets of racial slurs and stereotypes. This is ironic because the United States is supposed to be a melting pot of different races, cultures, and languages. Everyone’s families had to have immigrated to the United States from various other countries around the world. There is no surprise that when the Japanese immigrated to Hawaii, and then to the United States in the latter part of the nineteenth century, they became the newest target of prejudice. The Japanese Americans have gone through tremendous amounts of struggles, possibly more than any other group of immigrants. Their immigration was forced, then being accused of being a threat to …show more content…
This was the first time that the U.S.A. was attacked on home soil in generations. The attack on Pearl Harbor caused a detrimental effect on the country, and the Japanese American population. The Japanese Americans were now seen as a threat to national security. Because of Pearl Harbor: 110,000 – 120,000 Japanese Americans that resided on the West coast were put into internment camps. These internment camps were not nearly as horrible as the Nazi interment camps, but they were not nice either. The internment camps were located on the West coast in places such as Northern California, and southern Arizona. There were two War Relocation Authority (WRA) centers located in Arkansas. They changed the dynamics of the lives of Japanese Americans and the lives of the American people as a …show more content…
This bill provided an opportunity for citizenship, and an evacuation claims bill fiscally compensated some of the Japanese for what they had lost. “The payments were meager and the average settlements estimated at ten cents per dollar. The Federal Reserve of San Francisco estimated the total loss for evacuees at $400,000,000” (Spickard 89). Most Japanese Americans decided to relocate from the west coast and move eastward, “between 1940 and 1970 the percentage of Japanese Americans concentrated in the western states dropped from 95% to 81%” (Woodrum 159). They were not readily welcomed back into the rest of the

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