Negative Effects Of Eating Disorders

1256 Words 6 Pages
Eating is a key source for survival in life. In order for people to grow healthy and strong, one must eat regularly and consume a handful amount of proteins and vitamins. Although eating is key in life, there are also complications related to feeding, there are multiple eating disorders that people may branch off from. Some of them are called Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa, and Binge Eating Disorder. These eating disorders can have a negative impact in one 's physical body. During pregnancy, a mother needs to eat almost twice as much as usual. It is told in cultures that when pregnant, you need to think of your baby as a separate being. The habits that the mother may have, can affect the baby in a negative way. In Georgia’s case, she was …show more content…
Melanie is at a huge risk of getting an eating disorder the same as her mother, Georgia. There is a high connection between “Loneliness and Eating Disorders.” Her emotional development can be negatively impacted if she does get an eating disorder. Martha Peaslee wrote, “Loneliness, boredom, stress, … contributed to overeating and vomiting…purging helped them deal with unpleasant emotions, with the hurt of being laughed at” (p. 245). Kids get bullied for being overweight or seem anorexic in elementary through high school. Melanie may be at risk of feeling these emotions and other if this issue is not …show more content…
Before the intervention there was a “106.29 ± 16.5” problem based on the “Behavioral Pediatric Feeding Assessment Scale,” but after the intervention, there was a drastic decrease in feeding issues. The after intervention column showed an approximate “55.96 ± 7.58” frequency in problems (p. 156). The food refusal decreased as well. The frequency score before the intervention was approximate “.207” and after the intervention, it decreased to “.185.” (p. 157). Both Georgia and Melanie should be referred to therapy so Georgia can gain training and help Melanie eat solid food. This intervention may as well help Georgia. The questioner before the intervention included questions, “[asking] explicitly about “spitting out foods,” “vomiting during meals,” “refuses to swallow,” and “problems chewing.” It is likely that the significant correlation is due to this homology between items on the two different questionnaires” (p.

Related Documents