Negative Effects Of Autism

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Autism is widely characterized by being a neurodevelopmental disorder in which the effected individual has impaired social interaction, repetitive behavior, and in some cases no communication ability. Autism being on a spectrum perspective, a vast array of symptoms can categorize an individual as being “autistic”. ASD includes Asperger’s Disorder, Kanner’s Syndrome, Rett’s Syndrome, and PDD (Pervasive Developmental Disorder). While all disorders are challenging, severity of behaviors depend entirely on the individual. The most prominent signs of autism are repetitive behaviors, lack of empathy/isolation, and limited or non-existing communication skills (Lord, 2010). Autism can be caught very early on in a child’s life, even as young as a …show more content…
Some scientists think a few forms of autism are manifested in the childhood years alone, but others agree that the disorder displays itself differently across life stages. According to the National Autistic Society, 1 out of every 88 children in the human population have a form of ASD. As far as treatment is concerned, a few things can be done consistently by the family of the autistic individual (depending on the severity). To start off, antipsychotic, antidepressant, and stimulus drugs can be prescribed along with therapeutic and enriching programs. A great deal of patience is needed for the evaluation and treatment of an autistic person because there is no known …show more content…
In most cases, autistic children need constant supervision for the safety of themselves and others. Also, medical bills in regards to ASD specialty doctors and therapists can be very taxing for families, especially if the child effected is non-communicative. Siblings of autistic children that are not old enough to understand the disorder might alienate and/or subject the diagnosed child with incessant teasing, which can further induce stress for parents. An online survey in 2013 collected data from 253 parents caring for a child with a form of Autism. Not only did both parents agree to higher levels of parental stress, lower levels of marital satisfaction were reported. Divorce rates were extremely high pertaining to the participating parents. Out of the survey, 13% of parents with an autistic child met the criteria for major depressive disorder, and 15% met the criteria for generalized anxiety disorder (Shtayermman, 2013). In addition

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