Needs, Values And Importance Of Patient-Centered Care

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Competency is a topic of great interest to educators and administrators in practice disciplines, particularly health care disciplines such as nursing. Providing care that is respectful and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs, and values, thereby ensuring that patient values guide all clinical decisions (Ponte, et.al, 2014). Traditionally, care has been organized around the needs and desires of healthcare professionals, particularly the physicians. Although, the centrality of patients and families seems understood as a basic tenet of healthcare, restructuring organizations around the needs of patients and families has in fact challenged most hospital-based organizations to significantly change a long-existing culture. Therefore, …show more content…
This is exactly the principle behind the growing movement toward patient-centered care (PCC), Physicians, practicing patient-centered care improve their patients’ clinical outcomes and satisfaction rates by improving the quality of the doctor-patient relationship, while at the same time decreasing the utilization of diagnostic testing, prescriptions, hospitalizations, and referrals. Patient-centered practitioners focus on improving different aspects of the patient-physician interaction by employing measurable skills and behaviors (Ponte, et.al, 2014). This type of care can be employed by physicians in any specialty, and it is effective across all disease …show more content…
Effective care is generally defined in consultation with patients rather than by physician dependent tools or standards. For instance, An orthopedic surgeons employ the Harris Hip Score to judge the success of total hip replacements (Ponte, et.al, 2014). It was designed solely by physicians and does not even ask patients to rate their satisfaction with the procedure; it answers the questions important to the doctors and thought to be important to patients. In essence, the first step in understanding patient-centered care is understanding that patients be asked to rate or judge their health care. Providers often believe that they know everything about their patients and their care, but they are simply unable to accurately assess their patients’ perceptions of care, what is important to them, how well they are delivering care or what factors in their patients ' care improve outcomes (Ponte, et.al, 2014). As health care providers, we need to attempt to move from what is the matter with our patients to what matters to our patients. Therefore, the patient- centered care continues to evolve. This is evidenced by the American association of colleges of nursing (2014). There are 6 proposed dimensions of patient-centered care. namely; (a). Respect for patients’ values, preferences, and expressed needs (b) Coordination and integration of care through

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