Naziism In Germany

1260 Words 6 Pages
Many people wonder how Adolf Hitler, a man blamed for the start of WWII and characterized for his fascist policies that resulted in millions of deaths, could have come to power in Germany during the 1920-1930s. Hitler rose to power in German politics as leader of the National Socialist German Workers Party, also known as the Nazi Party (or NSDAP). He was elected chancellor of Germany in 1933, and served as dictator from 1934 to 1945. Even at a young age, Adolf Hitler had a strong passion for German nationalism. This became evident in his early beer-hall speeches, specifically the famous coup of 1923 in which he announced that the national revolution had begun and declared the formation of a new government. Now one might ask why anyone would …show more content…
The treaty was comprised of over 400 articles, a majority of it written solely by the Allies. The overall goal was to prevent Germany from starting future war, and to do so it heavily stripped them of colonies and armed forces. The treaty also left Germany with numerous financial obligations for post-war reparations. These extremely harsh terms generated intense political debate/division, as the vast majority of Germans were sharply divided as to how to respond to it. Right-wing nationalist groups, like Hitler and the Nazi Party, demanded the government repudiate the treaty and refuse to comply with its terms. The moderates and pragmatists of the Weimar republic rejected this approach, as they believed that it would provoke retaliation, economic strangulation, war, and/or invasion. German nationalists and the general public tended to side with the Nazis, sharing the same consensus that the Weimar government had sold Germany out to its enemies. The support Hitler received in denouncing the treaty illustrates how he and the Nazi Party were able to gain power from the state of Germany following the Treaty of …show more content…
In 1929, the American Stock Exchange crashed, and shortly thereafter forced America to withdraw hefty loans paid to Germany from World War I. The German economy was neither prepared or equipped for the retraction of American loans, since it was built and heavily reliant upon foreign capital/trade. This rapidly propelled the nation into an economic downfall. By 1932, industrial production was at 58% of 1928 levels, and almost two-fifths of the German workforce were without a job. As discussed earlier, Chancellor Heinrich Brüning of the Weimar Republic choose not to increase spending in response to the depression, as he feared inflation and deficit more then unemployment. His decision to increase taxes and implement wage cuts failed miserably, leading to more unemployment/suffering. As a result of the Great Depression, many men and women of all social classes abandoned their support for mainstream and moderate parties, and began to support more radical groups such as Hitler and the NSDAP. Without the miserable conditions created by the Great Depression, Hitler would have not received the opportunity that he needed to be put into the public eye as the “hero” or “answer” to the disastrous economic state of

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