Native Sayed Kashua Analysis

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Sayed Kashua’s collection of newspaper columns, Native, tells the story of Kashua’s life living in a divided Israel as an Arab. The Arab-Israeli conflict occurring in Israel has created unmasked tension between the Arabs and Jews who are sharing the land. This has created a culture of each group wanting to garner support and sympathy for their “side” of the conflict. As an Arab writing to a Hebrew audience, one might assume Kashua uses his newspaper column to promote the Arab side. While Kashua does partake in telling stories pertaining to the conflict, such as stories of the discrimination he faces as an Arab, his stories appear to be of real-life experiences without any built-in Arab propaganda. Although a superficial reading of Sayed …show more content…
He writes about being ostracized by his Arab community, and in particular his father, for wearing a seatbelt, which is not consistent with Arab culture. Kashua tries to argue to his father in one instance that he forgot he was wearing the seatbelt when he drove into his village, and in another instance, that he only put on his seatbelt because he thought he saw the police. However, it can be inferred that Kashua truly wears his seatbelt in order to feel more Jewish and therefore closer to being respected. Jewish readers who pick up on this longing to be Jewish and therefore respected feel in turn respected by Kashua and therefore willing to listen openly to what he is saying throughout his …show more content…
Throughout his columns, Kashua includes stories that play to Jewish reader’s emotions by making them feel respected or appreciated from an Arab’s point of view. For example, Kashua includes his wish to send his daughter to a Jewish school. Superficially it might seem that this is solely because the schools are better and more secular; however, on a deeper level, Kashua feels that he has had better opportunities and is better respected because of his Hebrew schooling growing up and he is thankful for this aspect of his upbringing. Kashua’s explanation of his wish to send his daughter to a Jewish school makes Jewish readers feel respected and makes them more open to listening to his

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