Native American Treatment In The 1800s

Improved Essays
Native American 's Treatment In The 1800s

Have you thought of all the land that is the now U.S? Have you thought about how exactly did they acquire the land? No one thinks of the people who lives were giving or taken for the expandtion of this great nation. The treatment that was endured by the Native Americans for more land, by greedy white settlers. Although the white settlers desired more land for settlement,the treatment of the Native American harsh and unjust.

Bureau of Indian Affairs:

The Bureau of Indian Affair was founded by then Secretary of War, John C. Calhoun on March 11, 1824. Later John C. Calhoun appointed Thomas McKenney as head of the beureau, he was to oversee treatdy negotiations, administer Indian trade, and mange
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By the 1850s the U.S. government had new plans to exert control over the Natives expandtion. The Dawes Act of 1887 was adopted by the U.S. congress in 1887, gave the president the right to survey American Indian tribal land. They divided the land into allotments for individauls Indians. The goal for the act was to get the Indians to accept the allotment and live away for their tribal, and in return those who did would be granted United States citizenship. The act was named after Henry Laurens Dawes, a senator in Massachusetts. Dawes objective was to bring the Native Americans out of poverty and to assimlate Natives into mainstream American society( an effort made by the United States to get rid of the Native American culture and turn it into European-American culture). Dawes was just another policy or act to encourage the " civillizing" process". The issue was that when new settlers moved into the nearby borders of the Natives territories they fought for resources and worked differently since different cultural beliefs. The Dawes act was to be " advatageous for agricultural and grazing purposes,"(Henry Dawes).This was another way to remove the Indian for their homes and turn that into something the U.S. could handle and control. But like when after the civil war with blacks, Natives still were treated …show more content…
Manifest Destiny is a term for a widely supported belief that in the United States settlers had the right and are destined to expand their country across North America. While the belief for manifest Destiny turned America into what they are today, Manifest Destiny led to the Indian removal act and the Trail of tears. The Removal act was passed in may of 1830 by congress, while Jackson was still president. The act allowed the president to negotiate with the tribes in the south for their removal to a fedetal government territoy west of the Mississippi River. What did the American wanted in return, the Natives ancestral homelands. While there were protest for many Christian missinaries, there were a very huge support from non-Indian people living in the south,that were more than eagar to have access to the Indian land. The trail of tears was one of the series of the forced relocation of the Native nations that followed after the Indian Removal Act of 1830, where the Natives were force to walk across the country. The Trip to the Mississippi was anything but pleasent. Through the route the Native used, they endued harsh weather and treatment for the settlers.Along with exposure to strange diseases for their people and starvation The Native lost men, women, and children, by the time the trail of trail were over more than half of the Native American were dead thanks to

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