Native American Relations Essay

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As I analyze the history of America and the relations between Native Americans and the United States government a common theme that occurs is the government’s takeover of Native American’s land. Therefore, this paper will analyze the history of America and the relations between Native Americans and the United States government, the Indian removal act, the difference in cultures, and how it is relevant today with the Dakota Access Pipeline. From the time Christopher Columbus discovered the Americas, the native people of the Americas, along with their beliefs, have been taken advantage by the power hungry Europeans. The less developed Native Americans were brutally overpowered by the more advance Europeans who had no intentions of making peace …show more content…
Native tribes who have been living off the land for hundreds of years were being forced off by means of war. In 1814, General Andrew Jackson forced the creek Indians of present day Alabama to sign a treaty after the Battle of Horse Shoe Bend (Goodman). This one instance gave over twenty-million acers of land to the U.S government (Goodman). Jackson continued to force war upon the Indians so that they would give up their lands which were so valuable to the Indians. In efforts to continue expansion, the U.S government made many treaties with the Native Americans. Finally, President Jackson convinced congress to issue the Indian Removal Act in …show more content…
According to Corn Tassel, a Cherokee statesman, “It is a little surprising that when we entered into treaties with our brother, the whites, their whole cry is more land!” (Nabokov 121). The Native Americans were aware that every treaty the whites proposed that they were after land. Corn Tassel explains how his white “brothers”, with a superior force, marched onto the lands of the Cherokee people and killed and spread fire to their communities (Nabokov 122). The white’s obsession over claiming land and their developed military led to how they treated the Native Americans. The whites didn’t see the Indians as people but as savages, which was totally different perspective than Corn Tassel’s who called the whites as his

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