Nationalism In Germany, Germany And The Austro-Hungarian Empire

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Studying the nations on the verge of World War One shows the long-term ramifications in the century to follow and the origin of the problems of earlier periods. When examining these concepts, it is essential to recognize the connections and variations in nations. In considering, Germany and the Austro-Hungarian Empire present the differences between a new state and a decaying empire. The influence of military, nationalism, and history allowed for the establishment of commonality, and shared values within the divided peoples of Germany. The Austro-Hungarian Empire 'worked with a politically divided collection of states, and multi-culturalism lead to isolated ethnic groups. Germany and the Austro-Hungarian empire were at markedly specific stages …show more content…
The strength of nationalism allowed for the German communities to come together to create the modern nation of Germany. Germany was a “nation [which] recognize[ed] no races anymore; all speak of language, all depend on the mother, Deutschland.” The consequences of nationalism spread across Europe in the late nineteenth century. Nationalism became part of the culture as a country formed a national identity, but, it required a strong sense of national identity to maintain a united nation. The belief formed of “German morals and German customs speak to us like newly discovered sources of everything beautiful.” On the brink of World War One as Germany approached war they required to figure out who was their …show more content…
The political division contributed to issues of establishing an operating government in countries that remained long under the domination of a centralized government. These countries transformed into unstable states and after World War Two states were taken under the control of a stronger state. The other long-term issues were ‘multi-culturalism’. Zweig wrote of Vienna as perfectly content, but it was not, there was violence under the surface. There were ethnic related events like deportation of the Albanians from Yugoslavia, the concentration camps constructed by the Croatian government after World War Two and the genocide of the Bosnian War in the nineteen-nineties. The impact of a divided Empire and the movement of people has long-term consequences in the latter-half of the twentieth

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